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Why College is Important: Fun Activity and Presentation

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Product Rating
3.9
Teachers Pay Teachers
Presentation (Powerpoint) File
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7.77 MB   |   16 pages

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Students LOVE this activity. Pre-make ziplock bags with 18 m&ms, 33 m&ms, and 61 m&ms in them. Have Ss count their m&ms, and then use this beautifully colored powerpoint to explain the correlation between education and higher salaries.
Total Pages
16
Answer Key
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Teaching Duration
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Average Ratings

3.9
Overall Quality:
3.9
Accuracy:
3.9
Practicality:
3.9
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3.9
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3.9
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8 ratings

Comments & Ratings

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On  March 9, 2014,  Emily H. said:
This is a great resource to use to introduce college and career ready material in a fun way. My students will really like this activity.
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On  January 23, 2014Jessica Smallwood (TpT Seller) said:
love the M&M activity and so did my students! They really got to see the importance of college!
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On  November 22, 2013,  Buyer said:
great!
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On  April 25, 2013,  Kristina W. said:
I am really looking forward to using this presentation with my 4th grade students. What a great introduction to college thinking!
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On  March 14, 2013,  Beverly C. said:
Looks great. Can't way to use it.
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On  October 17, 2012,  Buyer said:
Awesome idea to get kids thinking about the future! Thank you!
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On  September 28, 2012,  Kenyetta T. said:
I used this lesson for my 3-6 graders. They loved it. I also loved how you had the different ways that you can use the 2.5 million dollars, that one REALLY got conversation started!
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On  August 4, 2012,  Diana M. said:
I can't wait to use this to share with others.
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Product Questions & Answers

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On  November 3, 2012,  Carol C. asked:
This lesson sounds great. Can you give me an idea of how long the lesson would be. I am a counselor grades K-6th w/about 20 min. in a class. Can it be used across each grade level? Can you elaborate on how the m&m's work to explain correlation....
Teachers Pay Teachers
On  November 4, 2012Ms Laura answered:
In the past, I've taught this lesson to 5th-8th graders, usually in a 45-60 minute block. All of the grades love it, and while I imagine that you might need to modify the language slightly for kindergarteners, I think it could still be used.

I teach in a low income area with a high school graduation rate of 1 in 10, and a college graduation rate of 1 in 200. Therefore, I hand out bags of M&Ms slightly comparable to those statistics, although a bit more generous-- I'll give 2 in the class "high school" salaries, and 1 a "college salary." I use the lesson alongside a few lessons on malleable intelligence and the achievement gap in order to stress the importance of earning an education.

I'm not sure what the statistics are for your area, but you could use the national statistics for high school and college graduation rates. At the beginning of the class, I pass out the M&Ms in ziplocks, have them count them, and then allow them to eat them as I talk. I then have them stand up if they have 18 m&ms, 63, etc. I ask them if it's fair that one student got 63, while another got only 18. Then I ask them if it would be fair if every day they came in I gave them the same number of m&ms, and one students ALWAYS got 18, while another student ALWAYS got 63. Obviously, they are outraged by this injustice, and I transition into the lesson on salaries.

In terms of time, I think that 20 minutes might be a bit too short to give the whole lesson, but you could split it into two days. On the first day, you could explain the significance and have them count the M&Ms. On the second day, you could talk about how much money $2.5 million is, and maybe give them a few minutes to draw or talk about what they would use the money for.

Hope that helps!
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Why College is Important: Fun Activity and Presentation
Why College is Important: Fun Activity and Presentation
Why College is Important: Fun Activity and Presentation
Why College is Important: Fun Activity and Presentation