Not a member? Join for FREE
Home
Michael Cummings
 (20)
Canada - Ontario - Kanata
n/a
3.9
80 votes
"And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche".
 
FREE Download
Assess the general quality of my work with this free download
Please Rate Me!
4.0
This commentary provides a chapter-by-chapter analysis of John Wyndham's The Chrysalids. It includes content tests and answer guides, as well as...
$12.00
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Grades:
Duration:
3 Weeks
3.9
This is a hundred-word crossword puzzle that can serve as a review for a test on the novel or as a "fun" exercise. Students can work individuall...
$4.00
Digital Download
3.9
Subjects:
Duration:
N/A
4.0
This is a seventy-two word crossword puzzle on S. E. Hinton's novel The Outsiders. The crossword is intended to be done after a study of the nov...
$3.00
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Grades:
Duration:
50 Minutes
4.0
Students enjoy this crossword that can be used for review after a study of the novel or before a test. Students can work alone or in pairs. The ...
$4.00
Digital Download
4.0
4.0
This 100-word crossword puzzle is part of my Separate Peace commentary. The puzzle can be used as a review of the novel or as a preparation for a...
$4.00
Digital Download
4.0
4.0
These fifty-mark content tests are part of my commentary on The Chrysalids and are intended to test reading comprehension or to serve as a final ...
$5.00
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Grades:
Duration:
1 hour
4.0
This is a seventy-word crossword puzzle on Freak the Mighty and is intended as a review of the novel. The crossword can be done in groups of two...
$3.00
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Grades:
Duration:
50 Minutes
0.0
This is a hundred word crossword puzzle that can be used as a review of the novel or as a "fun" exercise that can be done either in groups or ind...
$4.00
Digital Download
Not yet rated
Subjects:
Duration:
1 hour
4.0
This is a 40 quotation identification test from my commentary on Hamlet. Students are awarded 1/2 mark for identifying the speaker and 1/2 mark ...
$2.50
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Duration:
40 Minutes
4.0
This crossword puzzle on The Chrysalids has been revised and upgraded to 100 words and is part of my commentary on the novel. It can be used for...
$4.00
Digital Download
4.0
3.5
This grammar exercise is part of my commentary on Lord of the Flies (132 pages, 52,000 words). The exercise traces the boys' descent into savage...
$3.00
Digital Download
3.5
4.0
This graph of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar provides an overview of the structure of a Shakespearean tragedy as well as an examination of the key e...
$3.00
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Duration:
50 Minutes
4.0
This commentary examines the Romantic age and focuses on four Romantic poets and their poetry: Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn" and "Ode to a Night...
$6.00
Digital Download
4.0
3.9
These two crosswords - one a review of the play; the other a quotation crossword - are intended to be used after the play has been studied. Stud...
$6.00
Digital Download
3.9
0.0
This crossword puzzle is part of my commentary on Miller's Crucible and is intended as a review of the play. Students enjoy the exercise, the cr...
$4.00
Digital Download
Not yet rated
Subjects:
Grades:
Duration:
50 Minutes
3.8
This study of Fitzgerald's philosphical allusions, religious imagery and colour symbolism is part of my commentary on The Great Gatsby and is int...
$4.00
Digital Download
3.8
0.0
(62 pages)This document discusses the structure and organization of the formal essay suggesting various methods of writing an effective introduct...
$7.00
Digital Download
Not yet rated
Subjects:
Duration:
N/A
3.8
(80 pages, 35,800 words)This commentary provides a detailed critique of the novel as well as a short comparison to Knowles' companion novel Peace...
$12.00
Digital Download
3.8
Subjects:
Duration:
3 Weeks
4.0
This is a hundred-word crossword puzzle on The Merchant of Venice that is intended for review after a discussion of the play. Students can work ...
$4.00
Digital Download
4.0
Subjects:
Duration:
1 hour
4.0
Most of this analysis of Hamlet's soliloquies is from my commentary on Hamlet (243 pages, 100,700 words) It focuses on each of the six soliloqui...
$6.00
Digital Download
4.0
Showing 1-20 of 101

FEEDBACK



















































Showing 1-50 of 75

Ratings

Digital Items
3.9
Overall Quality:
3.9
Accuracy:
3.8
Practicality:
3.9
Thoroughness:
3.9
Creativity:
3.9
Clarity:
Hard Goods
N/A
Shipping Efficiency:
N/A
Overall Quality:
N/A
Accuracy:
N/A
Practicality:
N/A
Thoroughness:
N/A
Creativity:
N/A
Clarity:
Used Goods
N/A
Shipping Efficiency:
N/A
Item as Advertised:

3.9
Total:
80 total vote(s)
Ask Michael Cummings a question. They will receive an automated email and will return to answer you as soon as possible. Please Login to ask your question.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:
n/a
Nashira D.
Hi Michael,

Thanks for letting me know that I had accidentally already purchased the content quizzes for The Chrysalids when I bought the commentary. I hadn't even noticed because I've only read through half of the commentary. Again, I'm really impressed by the detail and thoroughness of your work.

If you're happy to send me something else, I would love to have your commentary on the four romantic poets. I'll pay any difference in price.

Thanks for offering to help me out.

Nashira
March 10, 2014 Report inappropriate comment
n/a
Michael Cummings  (TpT Seller)
I'm more than happy to send you my notes on the four romantic poets without charge, Nashira. My email is m_cummings@sympatico.ca. Just email me and I'll send it on to you.

Tks again, Nashira,

Mike Cummings
March 10, 2014 Report inappropriate comment

Erin Palleschi
Erin Palleschi  (TpT Seller)
Invite sent! Welcome :)
Erin
March 3, 2014 Report inappropriate comment
n/a
Michael Cummings  (TpT Seller)
Tks, Erin.
March 3, 2014 Report inappropriate comment

Erin Palleschi
Erin Palleschi  (TpT Seller)
Hi there,
We have a FB group called Canadian Top Teacher Bloggers & TpT. If you send me your email address I'll send you an invite to join!
Thanks
Erin
March 3, 2014 Report inappropriate comment
n/a
Michael Cummings  (TpT Seller)
Hi Erin,

My email is m_cummings@sympatico.ca.

Tks,

Mike Cummings
March 3, 2014 Report inappropriate comment

n/a
Buyer
Mr. Cummings, I've been looking for you for some time and am so happy to have finally found you. Bennett Coles, Jeremy Pletcher and I have been in touch over the years and we wanted to thank you for the myriad wonderful ways in which you helped to shape our lives as such an inspirational teacher. You made writing a driving passion that has stayed with us all this time. Bennett even just quit his job recently to become a full-time author. http://www.bennettrcoles.com/. If you would like to get in touch, please email me (sl_noel@hotmail.com). It would be lovely to see you again. Sincerely, Sandra (formerly Kasprowicz)
February 25, 2014 Report inappropriate comment

n/a
Buyer re: Shakespeare: the Characteristics of the Tragic Figure
Is all of this content in your Hamlet analysis?
September 22, 2013 Report inappropriate comment
n/a
Michael Cummings  (TpT Seller)
Hi Tony,

Yes, the characteristics of the tragic figure is included in my commentary. The commentary on Hamlet (239 pages, 100,000 words) includes many teacher resources such as questions, tests, crossword puzzles, critical interpretations as well as a detailed analysis of the play. My website offers some selections from my commentary for those who want only the tests or essay topics or questions, puzzles, etc. but do not want the whole commentary. It is much cheaper and a better value to buy the whole commentary than to buy only selected parts of it. Good luck with the play; it's my favourite Shakespearean tragedy. Please contact me again if you have any questions. Students enjoy the discussion of the characteristics of the tragic figure. I like to begin telling them the story about tragedy from James Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and have them deduce for themselves the essential characteristics of the tragic figure. After telling the Joyce story, the teacher can direct students in a discussion or the class can be divided into groups, each group presenting a key characteristic of the tragic figure.

Tks,

Mike Cummings

P. S.

Tony,

I have added to my document on Shakespeare and the tragic figure with more specific information in the Glossary of Dramatic Terms, so please download again.

Hope this adds to your study of Hamlet.
September 22, 2013 Report inappropriate comment

n/a
Lynda M. re: The Crucible: Grammar Exercises
Michael,
I am confused as to why I should place an apostrophe after 1600s in the first sentence.
January 29, 2013 Report inappropriate comment
n/a
Michael Cummings  (TpT Seller)
The modern procedure nowadays is to omit the apostrophe just as it is now common procedure to omit the period after "Mr." or "Mrs." Either option is correct. If the apstrophe is used in "1600," the apostrophe is placed before the "s" (1600's)because the 1660's is a collective noun like the word "children's" or "p's" and "q's" in the expression, "Mind your p's and q's."

In London, England, the city council has created a heated controversy in its decision to remove the apostrophe from its street signs, arguing that the punctuation mark has become antiquated and confusing. This debate concerning the demise of the apostrophe appeared on the Internet on January 31, 2009:


LONDON - On the streets of Birmingham, the Queen’s English is now the Queens English.

England’s second-largest city has decided to drop apostrophes from all its street signs, saying they’re confusing and old-fashioned.

But some purists are downright possessive about the punctuation mark.

It seems that Birmingham officials have been taking a hammer to grammar for years, quietly dropping apostrophes from street signs since the 1950s. Through the decades, residents have frequently launched spirited campaigns to restore the missing punctuation to signs denoting such places as “St. Pauls Square” or “Acocks Green.”

This week, the council made it official, saying it was banning the punctuation mark from signs in a bid to end the dispute once and for all.

Councilor Martin Mullaney, who heads the city’s transport scrutiny committee, said he decided to act after yet another interminable debate into whether “Kings Heath,” a Birmingham suburb, should be rewritten with an apostrophe.

“I had to make a final decision on this,” he said Friday. “We keep debating apostrophes in meetings and we have other things to do.”


They confuse people

Mullaney hopes to stop public campaigns to restore the apostrophe that would tell passers-by that “Kings Heath” was once owned by the monarchy.

“Apostrophes denote possessions that are no longer accurate, and are not needed,” he said. “More importantly, they confuse people. If I want to go to a restaurant, I don’t want to have an A-level (high school diploma) in English to find it.”

But grammarians say apostrophes enrich the English language.

“They are such sweet-looking things that play a crucial role in the English language,” said Marie Clair of the Plain English Society, which campaigns for the use of simple English. “It’s always worth taking the effort to understand them, instead of ignoring them.”

Mullaney claimed apostrophes confuse GPS units, including those used by emergency services. But Jenny Hodge, a spokeswoman for satellite navigation equipment manufacturer TomTom, said most users of their systems navigate through Britain’s sometime confusing streets by entering a postal code rather than a street address.

She said that if someone preferred to use a street name — with or without an apostrophe — punctuation wouldn’t be an issue. By the time the first few letters of the street were entered, a list of matching choices would pop up and the user would choose the destination.

Grammarians revolt

A test by The Associated Press backed this up. In a search for London street St. Mary’s Road, the name popped up before the apostrophe had to be entered.

There is no national body responsible for regulating place names in Britain. Its main mapping agency, Ordnance Survey, which provides data for emergency services, takes its information from local governments and each one is free to decide how it uses punctuation.

“If councils decide to add or drop an apostrophe to a place name, we just update our data,” said Ordnance Survey spokesman Paul Beauchamp. “We’ve never heard of any confusion arising from their existence.”

To sticklers, a missing or misplaced apostrophe can be a major offense.

British grammarians have railed for decades against storekeepers’ signs advertising the sale of “apple’s and pear’s,” or pubs offering “chip’s and pea’s.”

In her best-selling book “Eats, Shoots and Leaves,” (sic) Lynne Truss recorded her fury at the title of the Hugh Grant-Sandra Bullock comedy “Two Weeks Notice,” insisting it should be “Two Weeks’ Notice.”

“Those spineless types who talk about abolishing the apostrophe are missing the point, and the pun is very much intended,” she wrote. (MSN, Saturday, January 31, 2009)

The decision to retain or eliminate or the apostrophe provides for interesting debate, for it serves to focus attention on the importance or relevance of punctuation; but suffice it to say that those who would abolish the apostrophe on the grounds that it is confusing, use a specious argument, for the purpose of punctuation—the apostrophe included—is not to create confusion but to avoid it, to provide clarity by eschewing vagueness or ambiguity.

I don’t know if you’ve noticed those wooden signs sold at various kiosks inscribed with a family name such as “The Wilson’s” or “The Abercrombie’s.” Most of these signs are wrong because the apostrophe is misplaced. “The Wilson’s” or “The Abercrombie’s” implies that only one Wilson or only one Abercrombie lives at that respective residence. To indicate the Wilson or the Abercrombie family, the sign should read “The Wilsons” or “The Abercrombies” without the apostrophe or “The Wilsons’” or “The Abercrombies’”with the apostrophe placed after the “s.” The signs without the apostrophe mean “The Wilsons or The Abercrombies live here”; the signs with the apostrophe after the “s” mean “The Wilsons’ or “The Abercrombies’ house, home, cottage or place of residence.” Another possibility is to say either “Wilsons” or “Abercrombies” without the apostrophe, the word “family” implied or understood, or “Wilsons’” and “Abercrombies’”with the apostrophe, simply omitting the definite article. With or without the definite article, though, the rule for the apostrophe as stated in the examples above still applies. If only one Wilson or one Abercrombie is intended, “Wilson” or “Wilson’s” and “Abercrombie” or “Abercrombie’s” are correct, but in these cases, the definite article “the” cannot be used and therefore must be omitted.

Hope this explanation helps. Mike Cummings
January 29, 2013 Report inappropriate comment

n/a
Henry Look  (TpT Seller) re: The Chrysalids
Hi, does your materials include test questions with answers? Thanks. Henry Look
May 29, 2012 Report inappropriate comment
n/a
Michael Cummings  (TpT Seller)
Hi Henry,
Included in my commentary are two quotation identification tests with answers, two content tests with very detailed answers and two essay tests with three choices for each test. I have not supplied an answer sheets for these two tests, but you will certainly find the answers in my commentary. Please contact me if you need any more information.
Tks,
Mike Cummings
May 30, 2012 Report inappropriate comment
TEACHING EXPERIENCE

I have been a high-school English teacher for over thirty years and continue to teach after my retirement as a supply teacher. While I was a PH. D student at Ottawa University, I taught a few courses to first-year students and a university summer course at the university's campus in Cornwall. I also taught a few summer courses to high school students for the Ottawa Board of Education. I enjoy writing critical commentaries on a wide variety of literary texts as well as teaching grammar and writing techniques. I especially enjoy dissecting works of literature and helping students come to grips with the text.

MY TEACHING STYLE

I have employed a wide variety of teaching styles: from classroom discussion and debate, to group work and oral presentations, to one-on-one tutorials, to note-taking skills and essay-writing techniques. I believe that having a solid grounding in one's subject, being well prepared, and having a genuine love and enthusiasm for learning are the keys to any teaching style and give one the versatility and adaptability to seize every teaching moment. I learn a great deal from students - both from their questions and their insights - and I encourage students to disagree with me and to present their own perspective and point of view. Please let me know of any changes you would like me to make so that I might tailor my documents to suit your specific needs. I welcome your comments and feedback; it is a real honour to share my ideas with you and I hope that you will find my commentaries beneficial to you and your students.

HONORS/AWARDS/SHINING TEACHER MOMENT

Yet to be added

MY OWN EDUCATIONAL HISTORY

B.A. - St. Patrick's College, Ottawa B.Theology - St. Paul University, Ottawa M.A. - Carleton University, Ottawa Ph. D courses and teaching - Ottawa University, Ottawa B. Ed. - Queen's University, Kingston

ADDITIONAL BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

I have published a number of literary commentaries for the Ottawa Board of Education. These commentaries, as well as a number of others, have been greatly updated and expanded. I have commentaries on a number of Shakespeare's tragedies-Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, Julius Caesar-complete with a detailed explanation of specific aspects of the play, as well as crossword puzzles, quizzes, essay and seminar topics, discussions of the characteristics of the tragic figure and graphs of the structure of a Shakespearean tragedy. I also have commentaries on The Great Gatsby, Darkness At Noon, A Separate Peace, Brave New World, The Crucible, The Chrysalids, A Man For All Seasons, The Pearl, The Moon is Down, Pygmalion, Caesar and Cleopatra, The Stone Angel, Lord of the Flies, Of Mice and Men, Henry IV, Part I, A Handbook on Grammar, Punctuation, Sentence Structure and Essay Writing, and many, many more. I am sure that many will find these commentaries a valuable resource. Please feel free to contact me through the Q@A forum - I am only too happy to help in any way I can. Mike Cummings