100 Student Credit Cards with Wages, Shop, Goals, and Key Questions

100 Student Credit Cards with Wages, Shop, Goals, and Key
100 Student Credit Cards with Wages, Shop, Goals, and Key
Grade Levels
Product Rating
Not yet rated

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

In an ideal world, students answer any question without hesitation and pride themselves without a need for anything else. Education is a valuable opportunity to develop children into their intrinsic motivation to improve themselves academically. However, in today’s classroom students are constantly distracted with social media, networking, mobile entertainment, athletes, etc. Video games reward players with coins improving self-esteem. Student credit cards work similar by rewarding students with WAGES for answering questions in a professional manner. Every student begins the year with a BASE credit card. When a student answers in a complete sentence, he or she earns a higher wage than stating a fact as a single word. If a student can answer with academic vocabulary, he or she earns more credits. The WAGES card suggests how to reward students. When a student earns twenty credits, award the student with their credit card to keep. Class applause is appropriate to build the student’s self-esteem. The teacher creates a new student credit card for the next level. All students begin with a BASE credit card that levels up to BRONZE, SILVER, GOLD, PLATINUM, RUBY, SAPPHIRE, EMERALD, and DIAMOND. If students level up once a month on average, many students can reach the DIAMOND level by the end of the school year. For this reason, consider rewarding students with the next level of credit card after 20 credits. The idea is that students will be motivated to receive their credit card by month’s end for the suggested monthly lunch party. The SHOP card offers teachers ideas for how students can spend their credits.

Choose any combination of BASE, BRONZE, SILVER, GOLD, PLATINUM, RUBY, SAPPHIRE, EMERALD, and/or DIAMOND credit cards totaling 100. Cards are coated on both sides for durability and shuffling. Shipping and handling costs are included in the price.

STUDENT CREDIT CARDS BEFORE INSTRUCTION
Meet and greet your students as they enter your room with your class credit cards in hand. Carry on conversations with yes and… techniques.
What did you do yesterday?
I went to the park.
Yes and…what did you do?
Played tag.
Yes and…with who?
My brother and sister.
Yes and…what are their names?
This positive approach to conversation may lead to developing purposeful relationships quickly.

As you consult with students their credit history, praise their successes. Prompt them for improvements and wish them good luck. Let them know how many credits they need in order to receive their credit card and level up.

As you shuffle the deck of cards while students enter class, scan through and observe trends on the cards. Who has a limited number of credits? Who has been on the same level of credit card for months? Who has several O-P-T marks on their card? Consult with these students briefly about how to improve their credit card. Allow them to take ownership by prompting them with, “What do you think you can do?” “Great choice.” For severe cases, consider using the orange INTERVENTION card with the blue SMILE card to develop a success plan for the student. Write notes on their card to remind you of the interventions and incentives discussed. Refer back to chapter 4 to read more about implementing OPT and the orange INTERVENTION card.

STUDENT CREDIT CARDS DURING INSTRUCTION
Remember to prompt the entire class with a question.
Then pause three to five seconds for all students to process and evaluate the question.
Draw the top card to reveal which student to ask for an answer. This is your individual checking for understanding. Whether right or wrong, simply respond with, “thank you” to allow for several student credit cards to be called. Refer to the purple WAGES card for credit earnings. Often more than one student will earn a wage.
After cold calling a third student credit card, consider prompting the class with, “What do you think of the three responses?”
Pause.
Cold call a credit card. “Thank you, Mason.”
“Class, let us conduct a UNIVERSAL check with a blue card. Do you agree (thumb up), disagree (thumb down), or don’t know (hands in the air confused) with Mason’s response?”
Pause three to five seconds for student processing.
“Okay, Class…What do you think of Mason’s response?”

At this point, you decide based on the UNIVERSAL check for understanding what students are capable of. If less than 75% of the class is incorrect, utilize orange DIFFERENTIATE cards to re-teach the class. This is where your backup plan helps. Through effective planning before instruction with the strategy cards, you will be able to meet the needs of all your students.

When you feel the class is ready for additional guided practice or independent practice, consider shuffling the deck of cards. For heterogeneous groups, draw cards randomly to form the group size you prefer. For homogeneous grouping based on academic proficiency, scan through the deck of cards and group BASE students together, BRONZE students together, etc.

Challenge yourself to withdraw several student credit cards each hour to contact their parents after school.

STUDENT CREDIT CARDS AFTER INSTRUCTION
How was your third hour of instruction? Can you remember it after the challenges fifth hour presented? Your phone calls home will be more efficient and effective due to your student credit cards available with meaningful feedback to offer parents. After instruction is a great opportunity to discuss with students their credit history. Relate their credit history to the real world. What do adults use strong credit ratings for? SMILE and OPT codes will surface as reminders of repeat offenses and opportunities to reward a student’s individual needs.

Which students should be grouped together tomorrow? Who do you want to speak with before class begins tomorrow?

As you implement student credit cards, ask yourself how you are meeting the expectations for:
1.1 Using knowledge of students to engage them in learning. How do you know your students as people and as learners? Understand reasons for behavior? Adapt your teaching to reflect knowledge of your students? Get to know parents and connect with the community where you teach?
1.2 Connecting learning to students’ prior knowledge, backgrounds, life experiences, and interests.
1.5 Promoting critical thinking through inquiry, problem solving, and reflection. Encourage, engage, and help all students to analyze, question, learn, and problem-solve.
1.6 Monitoring student learning and adjusting instruction while teaching. How do you systematically check for student understanding and revise plans accordingly? How do you monitor the learning of students with special needs? Systematically check for understanding and revise plans accordingly.
2.3 Establishing and maintaining learning environments that are physically, intellectually, and emotionally safe. Foster the development of each student’s self-esteem.
2.4 Creating a rigorous learning environment with high expectations and appropriate support for all students. Establish a productive, achievement-oriented climate in the classroom. Set high expectations for all students.
2.5 Developing, communicating, and maintaining high standards for individual and group behavior. Collaborate with students, families, and communities to establish, maintain, and communicate standards for student behavior.
2.6 Employing classroom routines, procedures, norms, and supports for positive behavior to ensure a climate in which all students can learn.
3.1 Demonstrating knowledge of subject matter, academic content standards, and curriculum frameworks.
3.2 Applying knowledge of student development and proficiencies to ensure student understanding of subject matter. Acquire understanding of students’ individual cognitive and social development. Build understanding of students in order to know how and when to differentiate instruction.
3.4 Utilizing instructional strategies that are appropriate to the subject matter
3.6 Addressing the needs of English learners and students with special needs to provide equitable access to the content.
4.1 Using knowledge of students’ academic readiness, language proficiency, cultural background, and individual development to plan instruction. Use knowledge of students’ individual cognitive, social, and physical development to plan instruction and make appropriate adaptations to meet students’ unique needs.
4.2 Establishing and articulating goals for student learning. Build on the strengths, interests, and needs of all students to establish high expectations for learning.
4.3 Developing and sequencing long-term and short-term instructional plans to support student learning. Design instruction so that students participate in setting and achieving their individual learning goals.
4.4 Planning instruction that incorporates appropriate strategies to meet the learning needs of all students.
4.5 Adapting instructional plans and curricular materials to meet the assessed learning needs of all students.
5.2 Collecting and analyzing assessment data from a variety of sources to inform instruction. Keep a continuous and comprehensive record of group and individual achievement. Collect, select, and reflect upon evidence of student learning. Work with families to gather information about all students and their learning.
5.3 Reviewing data, both individually and with colleagues, to monitor student learning.
5.4 Using assessment data to establish learning goals and to plan, differentiate, and modify instruction. Draw upon assessment data to support development of learning goals.
5.5 Involving all students in self-assessment, goal setting, and monitoring progress.
5.7 Using assessment information to share timely and comprehensible feedback with students and their families. Provide all students with information about their progress as they engage in learning activities.

WAGES, SHOP, GOALS, and KEY QUESTIONS Teaching Strategy Cards offer reminders near your eyes before, during, and after instruction. Question yourself regularly how you met the 10 GOALS. The KEY QUESTIONS can assist your planning and designing learning experiences for students. As you plan, be sure the questions developed will engage, create and maintain a learning environment, and rigorously demonstrate an understanding of student subject knowledge. Challenge yourself to less than 10 minutes for any activity to maintain engagement.

Try developing the habit of cold calling three students for the same question. Thank students for responding rather than correcting their responses. Reward students after all three answer using the WAGES suggestions. Ask students for WAGES and SHOP ideas.

As you implement these suggestions, ask yourself how you are meeting the expectations for:

1.1 Using knowledge of students to engage them in learning.
1.2 Connecting learning to students’ prior knowledge, backgrounds, life experiences, and interests. Open a lesson to capture student attention and interest. Offer opportunities for student products to provide evidence that they engaged in HIGHER-LEVEL (another product available) thinking skills.
1.3 Connecting subject matter to meaningful, real-life contexts. Establish a connection between subject matter and purpose for learning. Make connections between the subject matter and real-life contexts.
1.5 Promoting critical thinking through inquiry, problem-solving, and reflection.
2.2 Creating physical or virtual learning environments that promote student learning, reflect diversity, and encourage constructive and productive interactions among students. Establish a stimulating, curriculum-rich learning environment that supports content learning and academic vocabulary development.
2.3 Establishing and maintaining learning environments that are physically, intellectually, and emotionally safe.
2.4 Creating a rigorous learning environment with high expectations and appropriate support for all students.
2.5 Developing, communicating, and maintaining high standards for individual and group behavior.
2.7 Using instructional time to optimize learning. Organize instruction to optimize learning time. Structure time for both independent and collaborative learning opportunities.
3.1 Demonstrating knowledge of subject matter, academic content standards, and curriculum frameworks.
3.2 Applying knowledge of student development and proficiencies to ensure student understanding of subject matter. Connect content being taught to students’ prior knowledge and experiences.
3.4 Utilizing instructional strategies that are appropriate to the subject matter. Build on students’ life experiences, prior knowledge, and interests to make subject matter relevant and meaningful to students.
4.1 Using knowledge of students’ academic readiness, language proficiency, cultural background, and individual development to plan instruction. Incorporate students’ prior knowledge and experience in your curriculum and instructional planning.
4.2 Establishing and articulating goals for student learning. Communicate your GOALS and expectations with your students, daily. Incorporate easy to view Data Dashboard posters as clarifications.
4.4 Planning instruction that incorporates appropriate strategies to meet the learning needs of all students. Plan instruction to allow enough time for student learning, review, and assessment. Use your knowledge of subject matter and students to plan and appropriately pace instructional activities within a lesson.
4.5 Adapting instructional plans and curricular materials to meet the assessed learning needs of all students. Reflect on your successes and struggles and apply what you have learned about effective and ineffective strategies to existing plans for future lessons. Reflect on your successes and struggles with the use of the curriculum and apply what you have learned to existing plans for future lessons.
5.1 Applying knowledge of the purposes, characteristics, and uses of different types of assessments.
5.2 Collecting and analyzing assessment data from a variety of sources to inform instruction.
5.4 Using assessment data to establish learning goals and to plan, differentiate, and modify instruction.
5.5 Involving all students in self-assessment, goal setting, and monitoring progress.
Total Pages
100
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A

Average Ratings

N/A
Shipping Efficiency:
N/A
Overall Quality:
N/A
Accuracy:
N/A
Practicality:
N/A
Thoroughness:
N/A
Creativity:
N/A
Clarity:
N/A
Total:
0 ratings
COMMENTS AND RATINGS:
Please log in to post a question.
PRODUCT QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:
$9.00
Hard Good
User Rating: 3.9/4.0
 (11 Followers)
$9.00
Hard Good
100 Student Credit Cards with Wages, Shop, Goals, and Key
100 Student Credit Cards with Wages, Shop, Goals, and Key