15 Favorite Lessons: The Middle Ages, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 31-45/150

15 Favorite Lessons: The Middle Ages, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 31-45/150
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Supplement the textbook and eliminate preparation time with these 15 ready-to-use reproducible world history lessons focusing on the Middle Ages. Your students will enjoy a wide variety of high-interest activities for individuals, small groups, or the entire class.

Most lessons have three or four activity sheets and can be finished in one or two class periods. Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key provided for each lesson. A majority of the lessons include a 20-question follow-up quiz. The quizzes can also be given as homework assignments or review exercises. Most of the information-filled lessons are able to be used without a textbook.

LESSON/ACTIVITY TITLES (31-45 of 150)
31. Life in the Middle Ages
32. The Game of Feudalism
33. Medieval Times
34. The Medieval Church
35. The Byzantine Empire
36. The Growth of Islam
37. Game of the Crusades
38. Map Exercise: The Growth of Towns
39. Merchant Guilds and Craft Guilds
40. Password: Early Nation-States
41. Summary: The Middle Ages in Europe
42. Summary Test: The Middle Ages in Europe
43. India, China, and Japan
44. Africa: Land, Climate, and Early Peoples
45. Africa: History Map Game

Detailed descriptions of these lessons are provided below.


Bundle Discount
Individual lessons in this Middle Ages bundle are also available for purchase separately. But purchasing all 15 here enables you to save $8.86 (15%).


LESSON 31. Life in the Middle Ages

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with people and terms associated with the period of the Middle Ages.

TIME:
1 class period

The lesson begins as you read through a list of 36 people and terms related to the Middle Ages with the class. Students then use this information to answer a series of matching questions.

Next, it's time to play JEOPARDY!

Categories are PEOPLE, PLACES, RELIGION, EVENTS, and WORDS AND TERMS.

The class is divided into two teams. A volunteer from Team 1 is asked to pick a category and point value. For example, they might choose “PEOPLE for 20.” A question will then be asked about someone who lived during the Middle Ages. The first person to raise their hand will be called on. A correct answer earns the team 20 points. If a wrong answer is given, the team loses 20 points. The team also loses 20 points if someone raises their hand but does not give an answer immediately when called upon.

The person who gives the correct answer chooses the next category and point value. When a space is chosen, it is crossed out and cannot be picked again. When a wrong answer is given, the teacher gives the right answer. A new category and point value is then be picked by the person who gave the last correct answer. The same person cannot answer twice in a row for their team.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 32. The Game of Feudalism

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the role of lords, vassals, knights, and serfs in the system of feudalism.

TIME:
1 class period

The class is divided into groups of three or four students. Each group will have a gameboard, 24 cards, 1 die, and 2 colored markers for each player. The gameboard is formed by attaching the third and fourth lesson pages.

Players in each group will roll the die to see who goes first. The person with the highest number begins, and play continues to the left. Player 1 will put one of his two colored markers on space 20 of his scoring column in the center of the gameboard. Other players will do likewise. All players will then place their second colored marker on the corner space START. The 24 cards will be shuffled and placed alongside the gameboard.

The game begins when player 1 rolls the die and moves the number of spaces shown. Player 1 then reads aloud the information inside the space on which he has landed. Usually, a player will gain or lose 1 or 2 points. When this happens, their marker in the scoring column is moved forward or backward the appropriate number of spaces.

Any person who rolls a 6 will get another turn in addition to their regular turn.

Sometimes a player will land on a space marked TAKE A CARD. This player will remove the top card from the pile and read it aloud. The card will usually cause one or more players to gain or lose points. Each card tells about something which affects either knights, serfs, vassals, or lords. At various times during the game, a player is either a knight, serf, vassal, or lord depending on which side of the gameboard he is moving along at the time. The only exception to this is that a player is none of these people when he is on a corner space marked TAKE A CARD, TOURNAMENT, or START. Thus, the person who draws and reads the card is never affected by what it says. Only the other players are affected, unless also on TAKE A CARD, TOURNAMENT, or START.

Whenever someone lands on TOURNAMENT, each person along the “knight row” is affected. In the Middle Ages, a tournament involved competition in the form of a “joust” between two knights. In a joust, the knights charged at each other on horseback carrying a blunt, spear-like weapon. The knight who knocked the other off his horse was the winner. In this game, when a TOURNAMENT space is landed on, each knight (if there are any) will roll the die once. If they roll a 4, 5, or 6, they have won their joust and score 2 points. If they roll 1, 2, or 3, they have been knocked off their horse and lose 1 point.

If at any time during the game a player loses all of his points, he is out of the game. The winner of THE GAME OF FEUDALISM will be the first person to score 40 points. If no one has 40 points by the end of the period, then the winner is the player with the most points at that time.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 33. Medieval Times

OBJECTIVE:
To discuss aspects of life in Western Europe during the Middle Ages.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

This lesson is good at developing critical thinking skills as class members answer twelve thought questions relating to different aspects of life during medieval times.

EXAMPLES:
(1) The Dark Ages was a time of danger, confusion, and disorder.
Why do you think the expression “Dark Ages” -- instead of some other name -- was used to describe the early Middle Ages?

(2) The people of Western Europe were threatened by barbarians, robbers, and bandits.
If you had lived during the Dark Ages, would you have given up your freedom and become a serf in exchange for a lord’s protection? (Or would you have continued to farm your own land and risked being killed, robbed, or forced into slavery?)

You can have students do questions 1-6 during the first part of class, and then discuss answers later in the period.

Questions 7-12 can then be assigned for homework, and answers can be discussed at the beginning of the next day's class.

Teacher Instructions are included.


LESSON 34. The Medieval Church

OBJECTIVE:
To understand how the Church became the dominant institution of the Middle Ages.

TIME:
1 class period

This activity involves a fun game for the entire class that covers the following topics.

• Jesus and the Principles of Christianity
• The Spread of Christianity
• Activities of the Medieval Church

The game begins with everyone reading paragraph/question 1, as well as answer choices a, b, c, d, and e. Four of the five choices (which are statements) are correct answers.

Just below the question and answer choices, there are five empty boxes. Class members must fill in the first four boxes with the letters of the answers they believe are correct. Inside box 1, students put the letter of the answer they think has the best chance of being correct. In box 2, they write the answer they think is the best of those that remain. The same goes for boxes 3 and 4. Box 5 is reserved for the answer believed to be the wrong answer.

Following the completion of question 1, papers are exchanged and the four correct answers will be announced. Class members will circle the letters of the correct answers. Points are scored as follows:

0 points if box 1 does not contain a right answer
10 points if box 1 contains a right answer and box 2 the wrong answer
20 points if boxes 1 and 2 have right answers and box 3 the wrong answer
30 points if boxes 1, 2, and 3 have right answers and box 4 the wrong answer
40 points if boxes 1, 2, 3, and 4 contain right answers and box 5 the wrong answer

After doing all six questions, determine which students have scored the most points.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 35. The Byzantine Empire

OBJECTIVE:
To learn about the history, culture, and contributions of the Byzantine Empire.

TIME:
1 class period

The lesson begins by reading the introductory paragraph with the class about how, in the fourth century, the Roman Empire was divided into two parts.

Next, class members participate in a contest during which they read through a series of sentences about the Byzantine Empire and its contributions to civilization. Each sentence contains a phrase where the words have been scrambled. These words need to be rewritten in correct order in the space provided. The sentences are arranged into the following sections:

• Brief History of the Byzantine Empire
• Byzantine Way of Life
• Byzantine Contributions to Civilization

Later in the period, you can have students exchange papers and read all phrases in correct order as shown in the Teacher Instructions. The winners of the contest are the class members who correctly rearrange the most phrases.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 36. The Growth of Islam

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with Islam and its contributions to civilization.

TIME:
1 class period

This activity begins as each student is given a copy of the first three lesson pages containing three sections entitled:

• Muhammad and the Founding of Islam
• The Principles of Islam
• Islamic Civilization

Each of these sections contains 10 descriptions that are used to play a game during which the class is divided into five teams. Two key words, names, or terms are missing from each description.

When the game begins, papers are face down. The teacher reads descriptions 1-10 to the class, including the words that belong in the blank spaces (provided in Teacher Instructions). Students then turn their papers face up and the five teams are randomly assigned two of the ten descriptions. For example, Team 1 might be given 4 and 6, Team 2 may get 5 and 10, and so on. When the descriptions are being assigned, students can put the team numbers –– 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 –– in spaces preceding the descriptions.

The team that was assigned description 1 must try to identify the two missing words. Five points are awarded for each correct answer. When a team fails to give the right answer, announce the answer to the class. Continue in the same way with descriptions 2-10.

The second and third sections are played in the same way. Complete game rules are provided on the lesson pages.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 37. Game of the Crusades

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with the causes, major events, and results of the Crusades.

TIME:
1 class period

After reading with the class two brief introductory paragraphs, students need ten minutes or so to read and study information on an outline about the Crusades.

I. Causes of the Crusades.
II. Many Crusades were organized during a 200-year period.
III. Results of the Crusades.

Afterwards, the class is divided into five teams. Each team will be a group of Crusaders that follows one of the five routes to the Holy Land shown on a map on the third lesson page. The first team to reach the Holy Land defeats the Muslim Turks and wins the GAME OF THE CRUSADES.

The game begins when the teacher asks a question about the Crusades. (The fourth lesson page, which only the teacher has during the game, contains the list of questions.) Class members must look for the answer on their outlines. The first person to raise their hand is called on. If their answer is correct, space 1 on the map is crossed out for that person’s team.

If the person being called on gives the wrong answer, or does not answer immediately, the other four teams will each cross out a space. The same person cannot answer twice in a row for their team.

The first team with ten spaces crossed out wins the game.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 38. Map Exercise: The Growth of Towns

OBJECTIVE:
To understand how the growth of towns brought about changes in ways of living in the late Middle Ages.

TIME:
1 class period

This activity for individuals or pairs begins by assigning Parts 1-4 at the beginning of the period.

In Part 1 and Part 2, students answer a series of questions, and complete a word search puzzle, using information on a map showing towns of Medieval Europe around the year 1250. The map appears on the second lesson page.

In Part 3, class members read through several statements about the growth of towns in the late Middle Ages. Afterwards, they must decide which of sixteen descriptions correctly describe towns in the late Middle Ages, and which ones do not. Answers are either YES or NO.

In Part 4, students are challenged to rearrange letters of scrambled words pertaining to certain customs and practices, such as trade, education, and the arts ,that are common today but began long ago after the Dark Ages passed and towns began to grow in size.

Answers to all four parts of the lesson can be announced at the end of the period or at the start of the next day’s class.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 39. Merchant Guilds and Craft Guilds

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the purpose of medieval guilds and the effect they had on merchants, craftsmen, and townspeople.

TIME:
1 class period

To begin, class members are presented with 12 groups of words, numbers, and phrases at the top of the first lesson page. Each student underlines one choice in each of the 12 groups. This information is used later in the period.

Next, you can read through the background information about merchant and craft guilds with the class. Students then need about 10 minutes to do four follow-up questions that require brief written answers. Responses can be discussed among the class.

Class members conclude the activity by completing an application for guild membership using the choices they made at the beginning of the period. Their choices are used to fill in spaces on an application for membership in a medieval craft guild. As the teacher, you can ask for several volunteers to read their finished applications out loud. The rest of the class pretends to be a group of masters, and will vote to accept or reject the journeyman’s application. Choose at least one student who thinks their application has a chance for approval, and at least one who believes they have little chance for acceptance.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 40. Password: Early Nation-States

OBJECTIVE:
To understand how nation-states developed in England, France, and Spain.

TIME:
1 class period

The lesson begins by reading with the class background information about what a nation state is. Students will then complete a quick map study and answer questions about characteristics of a nation-state.

Next, class members read a section about the early nation-states of England, Spain, and France, and then do a series of matching questions based on that information.

The activity concludes with a fun PASSWORD game that is played using names, terms, and other facts given in the descriptions of early nation-states. Students can look back at these descriptions during the playing of the game. Complete game rules are provided on the lesson pages.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSONS 41-42. Summary and Test: The Middle Ages in Europe

OBJECTIVE:
To review the Middle Ages in Europe, and measure each student's knowledge on the topic.

TIME:
Review sheets (provided) are given ahead of time for studying outside of class. Test takes 1 class period.

You can distribute the review sheets several days before the test. Students should use them to prepare for the exam during their own time outside of class. The summary reviews the following topics covered in world history lessons 30-40 of 150.

• Dark Ages (400s to 1000)
• Later Middle Ages (1000 to 1400s)
• Terms Related to the Middle Ages
• The Medieval Church
• The Growth of Islam
• The Byzantine Empire
• Merchant Guilds and Craft Guilds
• Early Nation-States (England, France, Spain)

The test is the same summary that appeared on the review sheets, except with missing words, names, and terms.

Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 43. India, China, and Japan

OBJECTIVE:
To show the advances that took place in the Far East at a time when little progress was being made in Western Europe during the Middle Ages.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson includes a game for the entire class that is played using a series of 35 statements summarizing the cultural achievements which took place in these three countries of the Far East. A key word or name is missing from each sentence.

INDIA (1-15)
CHINA (16-25)
JAPAN (26-35)

The class is divided into two teams. Play begins when someone from Team 1 reads the first sentence. If that person can correctly identify the missing word or name, their team scores set number of points. Answers are worth either 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 depending on the difficulty of the question.

Teams take turns answering questions. If neither team gives the right answer after two tries each, the teacher announces the missing word or name.

The same person cannot answer twice in a row for their team, and team members cannot talk over possible answers.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 44. Africa: Land, Climate, and Early Peoples

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with the land and climate of Africa, and the effect that each had on the way of life of early African peoples.

TIME:
2 class periods

This lesson begins by reading with the class a section entitled The Land, which describes various landforms in Africa. This is followed by several multiple-choice, true/false, and matching questions. Students use the paragraphs they just read, along with a map (on the third lesson page) of Africa showing mountain ranges, deserts, rivers, lakes, and surrounding bodies of water, to answer the questions.

Next, in the Climate section, students use different colors or markings to complete a map activity illustrating the locations of Africa's various types of climate. This section also includes another group of multiple-choice questions that can be answered using the climate map students just worked on, as well as two other maps of average January and July temperatures throughout Africa.

A section entitled Early Peoples of Africa concludes the activity with 15 factual statements demonstrating the relationship between geography and culture. Class members use the information in the "Fact" section to help them decide which Result –– a or b –– was the way that the land and climate affected the early peoples of Africa.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 45. Africa: History Map Game

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with important events in the history of Africa from Stone Age times to the 1800s.

TIME:
2 class periods

Before starting this activity, students attach the third and fourth lesson pages with tape or paper clips to form a two-page map used to play the game.

Next, after reading through the introductory paragraph and game rules with the students, class members are divided into two teams.

During the game, the teacher announces a number that corresponds with a place on the two-page map. Also announced is a letter that corresponds with a description that will eventually be written next to the number/place on the map. The descriptions (found on the first and second lesson pages) contain groups of words that are out of order. Team 1 and Team 2 will compete to unscramble the words in the descriptions as numbers and letters are announced by the teacher. The first class member to raise their hand when the teacher announces a number and letter is called on. If that person recites the scrambled words in the right order, their team earns 10 points for each word in the answer. Correct answers are then copied in the spaces next to number 1 on the map.

Complete game rules are provided on the lesson pages.

After the game, there are Map Questions and True/False statements that can be assigned.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


See Also...
15 Favorite Lessons: Early Civilizations, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 1-15/150
15 Favorite Lessons: Ancient Greece & Rome, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 16-30/150
15 Lessons: Renaissance/Reformation/Explor. WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 46-60/150
15 Lessons: New World/Europe in Transition, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 61-75/150
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