1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)

1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
1984 Literature Circle Guide (AP Literature Long Fiction Unit 2 and 3)
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(1 MB|15 pages)
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Standards
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Help your AP Literature students navigate and analyze George Orwell's intriguing dystopian novel 1984. This student-centered resource will not only help your students dig deeper into the meaning of the text, but will also deepen your students' understanding of complex characters, settings, language, literary structures, archetypes, and symbols.

This resource includes:

  • Five literature circle role sheets aligned with the 2019 AP Literature and Composition CED standards to help students analyze the text.
  • A guide for using literature circles in your AP Literature class.
  • A literature circle teacher checklist to assess your students.
  • A reading calendar to help students coordinate the division of literature circle tasks.

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The five literature circle roles included are as follows:

  • The Characterization Guru
  • The Setting Sleuth
  • The Language Leveler
  • The Symbol and Archetype Decoder
  • The Structure Sage

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These role sheets cover the following AP Literature standards (2019):

  • CHR-1.T Different character, narrator, or speaker perspectives often reveal different information, develop different attitudes, and influence different interpretations of a text and the ideas in it.
  • CHR-1.U Foil characters (foils) serve to illuminate, through contrast, the traits, attributes, or values of another character.
  • CHR-1.V Inconsistencies between the private thoughts of characters and their actual behavior reveal tensions and complexities between private and professed values.
  • CHR-1.W A character’s competing, conflicting, or inconsistent choices or actions contribute to complexity in a text.
  • STR-1.X Some narrative structures interrupt the chronology of a plot; such structures include flashback, foreshadowing, in medias res, and stream of consciousness.
  • STR-1.Y Narrative structures that interrupt the chronology of a plot, such as flashback, foreshadowing, in medias res, and stream of consciousness, can directly affect readers’ experiences with a text by creating anticipation or suspense or building tension.
  • STR-1.Z Contrasts often represent contradictions or inconsistencies that introduce nuance, ambiguity, or contradiction into a text. As a result, contrasts make texts more complex.
  • NAR-1.P The narrator’s or speaker’s tone toward events or characters in a text influences readers’ interpretation of the ideas associated with those things.
  • NAR-1.Q The syntactical arrangement of phrases and clauses in a sentence can emphasize details or ideas and convey a narrator’s or speaker’s tone.
  • NAR-1.R Information included and/or not included in a text conveys the perspective of characters, narrators, and/ or speakers. NAR-1.S A narrator’s or speaker’s perspective may influence the details and amount of detail in a text and may reveal biases, motivations, or understandings.
  • NAR-1.T Readers can infer narrators’ biases by noting which details they choose to include in a narrative and which they choose to omit.
  • FIG-1.X When a material object comes to represent, or stand for, an idea or concept, it becomes a symbol.
  • FIG-1.Y A symbol is an object that represents a meaning, so it is said to be symbolic or representative of that meaning. A symbol can represent different things depending on the experiences of a reader or the context of its use in a text.
  • FIG-1.Z Certain symbols are so common and recurrent that many readers have associations with them prior to reading a text. Other symbols are more contextualized and only come to represent certain things through their use in a particular text.
  • FIG-1.AA When a character comes to represent, or stand for, an idea or concept, that character becomes symbolic; some symbolic characters have become so common they are archetypal.
  • CHR-1.AE Minor characters often remain unchanged because the narrative doesn’t focus on them. They may only be part of the narrative to advance the plot or to interact with major characters.
  • CHR-1.AF Readers’ interpretations of a text are often affected by a character changing—or not—and the meaning conveyed by such changes or lack thereof.
  • CHR-1.AG A character’s responses to the resolution of the narrative—in their words or in their actions—reveal something about that character’s own values; these responses may be inconsistent with the previously established behaviors or perspectives of that character.
  • CHR-1.AH Inconsistencies and unexpected developments in a character affect readers’ interpretation of that character; other characters; events in the plot; conflicts; the perspective of the narrator, character, or speaker; and/or setting.
  • STR-1.AK The resolution of the anticipation, suspense, or central conflicts of a plot may be referred to as the moment of catharsis or emotional release.
  • STR-1.AL Sometimes things not actually shown in a narrative, such as an unseen character or a preceding action, may be in conflict with or result in conflict for a character.
  • STR-1.AM Although most plots end in resolution of the central conflicts, some have unresolved endings, and the lack of resolution may contribute to interpretations of the text

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Teaching 1984? Check out the following resources:

  1. Dystopian World Building Project-Based Learning Unit
  2. Dystopian Literature Intro: Seeking "The Good Place" Assignment
  3. 1984 Anticipation Guide

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Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
Total Pages
15 pages
Answer Key
Rubric only
Teaching Duration
3 Weeks
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