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3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice

3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
3rd Grade Math STAAR Test Prep BUNDLE (ALL TEKS Included) STAAR Review Practice
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3rd Grade Test Prep-Practice Bundle! All TEKS included and CCSS alignment. - 20% Discount! Looking for multi-step standardized formatted practice assessments? These assessments could be used as review, practice, mini assessments, state test practice, and small group! Great for RTI!

In this resource Processing Standards are embedded in every item, items are written specifically to address the TEKS, multi-step problems are included, and purposeful wrong answer choices are used in order to identify possible student misconceptions. Every effort is taken to mirror the STAAR including use of the same font, types of graphics, and wording style.

What’s Included?
♦ 12 Assessments organized into 6 separate sections grouped by related standards.

♦ Each section includes two 10-question STAAR formatted assessments.

♦ A list of Readiness, Supporting, Processing and Common Core Standards.

♦ A Testing Blueprint for each section codes items by Readiness TEKS, Supporting TEKS, Processing Standards and Common Core Standards. This makes it simple to identify skills needing intervention! Great for RTI!

♦ A Student Answer Document for each section is also included.

♦ Sections Included:
1) Compare/Order and Composing Numbers
2) Fraction Practice & Models
3) Addition & Subtraction
4) Multiplication & Division
5) Geometry & Measurement
6) Data Analysis & Financial Literacy

*These are all available individually if you prefer. The Bundle groups them together at a discounted price!

TEKS INCLUDED:
Readiness Standards:
♦ 3.2(A) Compose and decompose numbers up to 100,000 as a sum of so many ten thousands, so many thousands, so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones using objects, pictorial models, and numbers, including expanded notation as appropriate.
♦ 3.2(D) Compare and order whole numbers up to 100,000 and represent comparisons using the symbols >, <, or =.
♦ 3.3(F) Represent equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using a variety of objects and pictorial models, including number lines.
♦ 3.3(H) Compare two fractions having the same numerator or denominator in problems by reasoning about their sizes and justifying the conclusion using symbols, words, objects, and pictorial models.
♦ 3.4(A) Solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
♦ 3.5(A) Represent one- and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 1,000 using pictorial models, number lines, and equations. 

♦ 3.4(K) Solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts.
♦ 3.5(B) Represent and solve one- and two-step multiplication and division problems within 100 using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations.
♦ 3.5(E) Represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions.
♦ 3.6(A) Classify and sort two- and three-dimensional figures, including cones, cylinders, spheres, triangular and rectangular prisms, and cubes, based on attributes using formal geometric language.
♦ 3.6(C) Determine the area of rectangles with whole number side lengths in problems using multiplication related to the number of rows times the number of unit squares in each row.
♦ 3.7(B) Determine the perimeter of a polygon or a missing length when given perimeter and remaining side lengths in problems.
♦ 3.8(A) Summarize a data set with multiple categories using a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals.

Supporting Standards:
♦ 3.2(B) Describe the mathematical relationships found in the base-10 place value system through the hundred thousands place.
♦ 3.2(C) Represent a number on a number line as being between two consecutive multiples of 10; 100; 1,000; or 10,000 and use words to describe relative size of numbers in order to round whole numbers.
♦ 3.4(I) Determine if a number is even or odd using divisibility rules.
♦ 3.3(A) Represent fractions greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using concrete objects and pictorial models, including strip diagrams and number lines.
♦ 3.3(B) Determine the corresponding fraction greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 given a specified point on a number line.
♦ 3.3(C) Explain that the unit fraction 1/b represents the quantity formed by one part of a whole that has been partitioned into b equal parts where b is a non-zero whole number.
♦ 3.3(D) Compose and decompose a fraction a/b with a numerator greater than zero and less than or equal to b as a sum of parts 1/b.
♦ 3.3(E) Solve problems involving partitioning an object or a set of objects among two or more recipients using pictorial representations of fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.
♦ 3.3(G) Explain that two fractions are equivalent if and only if they are both represented by the same point on the number line or represent the same portion of a same size whole for an area model.
♦ 3.7(A) Represent fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths as distances from zero on a number line.
♦ 3.4(B) Round to the nearest 10 or 100 or use compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition and subtraction problems.
♦ 3.4(D) Determine the total number of objects when equally sized groups of objects are combined or arranged in arrays up to 10 by 10.
♦ 3.4(E) Represent multiplication facts by using a variety of approaches such as repeated addition, equal-sized groups, arrays, area models, equal jumps on a number line, and skip counting.
♦ 3.4(F) Recall facts to multiply up to 10 by 10 with automaticity and recall the corresponding division facts.
♦ 3.4(G) Use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative,
and distributive properties.
♦ 3.4(H) Determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a
set of objects is shared equally.
♦ 3.4(J) Determine a quotient using the relationship between multiplication and division.
♦ 3.5(C) Describe a multiplication expression as a comparison such as 3 x 24 represents 3 times as much as 24.
♦ 3.5(D) Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers when the unknown is either a missing factor or product.
♦ 3.6(B) Use attributes to recognize rhombuses, parallelograms, trapezoids, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.
♦ 3.6(D) Decompose composite figures formed by rectangles into non-overlapping rectangles to determine the area of the original figure using the additive property of area. 

♦ 3.6(E) Decompose two congruent two-dimensional figures into parts with equal areas and express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole and recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. 

♦ 3.7(C) Determine the solutions to problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes using pictorial models or tools such as a 15-minute event plus a 30-minute event equals 45 minutes.
♦ 3.7(D) Determine when it is appropriate to use measurements of liquid volume (capacity) or weight. 

♦ 3.7(E) Determine liquid volume (capacity) or weight using appropriate units and tools. 

♦ 3.4(C) Determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.

♦ 3.8(B) Solve one- and two-step problems using categorical data represented with a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals.

♦ 3.9(A) Explain the connection between human capital/labor and income

♦ 3.9(B) Describe the relationship between the availability or scarcity of resources and how that impacts cost.
♦ 3.9(D) Explain that credit is used when wants or needs exceed the ability to pay and that it is the borrower’s responsibility to pay it back to the lender, usually with interest.

♦ 3.9(E) List reasons to save and explain the benefit of a savings plan, including for college.

Processing Standards:
♦ 3.1(A) Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
♦ 3.2(B) Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
♦ 3.2(C) Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
♦ 3.2(D) Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
♦ 3.2(E) Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.
♦ 3.2(F) Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas. √3.2(G) Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

Common Core Standards:
♦ 2.OA.C.3 Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
♦ 2.NBT.A.1 Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
♦ 2.NBT.A.1.A 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred."
♦ 2.NBT.A.1.B The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
♦ 2.NBT.A.3 Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
♦ 2.NBT.A.4 Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
♦ 3.NBT.A.1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.
♦ 3.NF.A.1 Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
♦ 3.NF.A.2 Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram.
♦3.NF.A.2.A Represent a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line.
♦ 3.NF.A.2.B Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.

♦ 3.NF.A.3 Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.
o 3.NF.A.3.A Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
o 3.NF.A.3.B Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

♦ 3.NF.A.3.C Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3 = 3/1; recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number line diagram.
♦ 3.NF.A.3.D Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
♦3.NBT.A.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
♦ 3.OA.D.8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.
♦ 3.OA.A.1 Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.
♦ 3.OA.A.2 Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.
♦3.OA.A.3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

♦ 3.OA.A.4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers.

♦ 3.OA.B.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.
♦ 3.OA.B.6 Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32 ÷ 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8. Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations.

♦ 3.OA.D.8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.
♦3.OA.D.9 Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.
♦ 3.MD.A.1 Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.
♦ 3.MD.A.2 Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).1 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.
♦3.MD.C.5 Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.
♦ 3.MD.C.5.A A square with side length 1 unit, called "a unit square," is said to have "one square unit" of area, and can be used to measure area.
♦3.MD.C.5.B A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.
♦ 3.MD.C.6 Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units).
♦3.MD.C.7 Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.
o 3.MD.C.7.A Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.

♦ 3.MD.C.7.B Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole- number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.
♦ 3.MD.C.7.C Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.
♦ 3.MD.C.7.D Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.
♦ 3.MD.D.8 Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
♦3.G.A.1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.
♦ 3.G.A.2 Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.
♦ 3.MD.B.3 Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.



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Copyright © Catherine Solanik. All rights reserved by author. This product is to be used by the original downloader only. Copying for more than one teacher, classroom, department, school, or school system is prohibited. This product may not be distributed or displayed digitally for public view. Failure to comply is a copyright infringement and a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Clipart and elements found in this PDF are copyrighted and cannot be extracted and used outside of this file without permission or license. Intended for classroom and personal use only.


♥ I hope this description helps to clarify! If you have any questions or would like to contact me feel free to email me at cat@catherinesolanik.com.

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Catherine Solanik


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