4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game

4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
4.NBT.A.2 Spinner Game
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(1 MB)
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Standards
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This game focuses on 4th grade level Place Value. It requires students to understand standard form, expanded form, word form, digits in each place, as well as the value of each digit. As part of the game, students are also required to compare numbers. This game includes 12 number cards ranging from 3 digits to 6 digits. It requires minimal prep time.

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Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 Γ— 8 equals the well remembered 7 Γ— 5 + 7 Γ— 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression π‘₯Β² + 9π‘₯ + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 Γ— 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(π‘₯ – 𝑦)Β² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers π‘₯ and 𝑦.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
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