Whoops! Something went wrong.

Click here to refresh the page

4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers

4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
4.NBT.B.6, 5.NBT.B.6, and 6.NS.B.2 Division of Whole Numbers
Grade Levels
Common Core Standards
Product Rating
4.0
7 ratings
File Type

PDF (Acrobat) Document File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

3 MB|37 pages
Share
Product Description
1. These Lesson Plans explain the division of whole numbers using strategies that increase students' understanding of place value.


2. These Lesson Plans review the basic skills that students need to have acquired while in the third grade to successfully perform fourth and fifth grade division. These third grade skills include:

- Knowing that the answer to a division problem can be found by arranging objects into equal groups or rows.

- Knowing the products of all two one-digit numbers (6 x 4 = 24).

- The use of the commutative, associative, and distributive properties of multiplication.

- How to multiply a one-digit number by a multiple of ten (6 x 40 = 240).

- The use of arrays and area models to model multiplication and division problems.

- That multiplication and division have an inverse or opposite relationship. ("If I know that 6 x 4 = 24, I also know that 24 ÷ 4 = 6").


3. Fourth and fifth grade students continue to use arrays, area models, equations, and the inverse relationship between multiplication and division to further understand and explain their division work.

- Fourth grade students divide up to four-digit numbers by one-digit divisors (Example: 132 ÷ 4 = 33).

- Fifth grade students divide up to four-digit numbers by two-digit divisors (Example: 210 ÷ 14 = 15).


4. Sixth grade students learn the traditional method of division. (Sixth Grade Standard 6.NS.B.2).


5. These Lesson Plans include templates that allow teachers to modify and create additional practice problems for students.
Total Pages
37 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
2 Weeks
Report this Resource
Loading...
$4.50
Digital Download
More products from Implementing the Common Core
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
$4.50
Digital Download
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign up