4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK | EDITABLE

4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
4th GRADE NUMBER OF THE DAY | NUMBER SENSE | MATH MORNING WORK |  EDITABLE
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(3 MB|183 pages)
Standards
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  1. This bundle includes a collection of math materials to use with your 4th grade students.Inside you'll find an entire year of spiral review homework/morning work, 3 assessments for every standard, math journaling pages, and daily number activities.Please take a look at the previews for each of the r
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  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Today's Number / Number of the Day 4th Grade Common Core Daily Math Review includes an editable PowerPoint file to add any other number you need!

This resource contains 183 printable pages to make it easy to review important math skills on a regular basis.

I also have a version available for 2nd and 3rd grade if you need to differentiate within your classroom.

I created the Today’s Number series to use in my own classroom as a spiral review for my third graders. I include one page each week as part of my Math Workshop / Guided Math Rotations.

You may also find it useful to use the pages as homework or when you have a sub. I keep one copy on hand as a “go to back up activity” in the event that I am unexpectedly called out of the classroom or if I’ve planned a lesson involving technology only to find that said technology is choosing not to work at that specific moment.

INTRODUCING THE TODAY’S NUMBER ACTIVITY:

I found it best to introduce the page slowly. Instead of just passing them out and having them get started I first modeled how to fill in the boxes (only a few at a time) using my projector over the course of several days.

Next, I walked the students through the form again in small groups.

Finally, I keep a completed model available for them to look at if needed, but they complete the page independently (or sometimes with a partner).

THE BACK OF TODAY’S NUMBER:

Originally I had my early finishers use the number of the day to create equations that equal that number. However, I found that some wrote too large and disorganized. I also noticed that some students were simply writing equations such as, “99+1=100, 98+2=100, 97+3=100, etc” All were accurate, but certainly not stretching their minds.

It was for those reasons that I created a form. It has two columns to help organize their work. Also, it includes a box for “rules.” One rule that is included every. single. day is my “no patterns rule” which prevents them from the list above. Other rules require them to challenge themselves a bit. Some examples include:

Each equation MUST include a + and a -.

Each equation needs to be written using only even numbers.

Each equation must include 4 addends.

Because the activity is open-ended and can literally go on forever, I have them keep their paper in their folder to use when other activities are completed during the week and collect them on Friday.

It covers the following Common Core Standards for Math

4.NBT.3, 4.NBT.4, 4.NBT.5, 4.NBT.6 4.OA.2, 4.OA.4, 4.OA.5

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)
Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = __ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?.
Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.
Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
Total Pages
183 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
1 Year
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