A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project

A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Character Analysis Project
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This assignment is titled “A Midsummer Night’s Dream: The Social Network,” an excellent form of differentiated instruction to teach one of Shakespeare's most famous comedies.

We hear a lot these days about how our students enjoy communicating with one another on sites like Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter.

This assignment is essentially a character analysis assignment in the form of a “mock social network.”

Students must imagine that characters from A Midsummer Night’s Dream have social networking pages where they post their thoughts, concerns, activities, motivations, and more.

There have been many creative ways to teach A Midsummer Night’s Dream over the years including mock newspapers, mock trials, and the like. This particular project puts a 21st century spin on those assignments and allows students to express themselves in a familiar medium.

This packet includes pages for ten characters in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Students may role-play as any of them (or all of them) and write “status updates” as if they were the characters. They must write updates in a way that imaginatively demonstrates their knowledge of the character.

Ideas for doing so might include interpreting the character’s motivations, justifying his/her actions, inventing private thoughts, and more. The idea, however, must apply to all: we must find this character’s social networking profile “believable”; the student must stay within character to prove their knowledge of the play.

For example, a student might role-play as Egeus and post thoughts that reflect his heavy-handed viewpoints about his daughter Hermia’s courtship of Lysander, while a student role-playing as the fairy Puck might make comments about tomfoolery and pranks he has pulled on the humans in the play. A student might take artistic liberty to imagine Nick Bottom’s bottomless advice for anyone who will listen, while another student might consider exploring Helena’s deeply personal motivations and feelings.



A Midsummer Night's Dream Social Network Project (Character Analysis) by Christopher Mitchell is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Total Pages
11 pages
Answer Key
Rubric only
Teaching Duration
N/A
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