Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides

Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
Aboriginal Australia Art History - Aborigini Art - 218 Slides
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43 MB|218 pages
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This is a complete presentation on Australia's Aboriginal & Torres Strait Art History. MANY ACTUAL SLIDES ARE IN THE PREVIEW. IT IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF QUALITY.

Includes the following movements:
Aboriginal Memorial
Albert Namatjira & Hermannsburg Community- watercolor and ceramics
Western Desert Painting
The Kimberley
Bark Painting & Sculpture
Urban Contemporary
Torres Strait Islanders
Photography
Textiles

* You might also like *
Aboriginal & Torres Strait Art Poster
Charles Blackman
Australian Art History
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Maori Art History

TEXT EXCERPT about Papunya’s Indigenous art movement:
-- Aboriginal community of Papunya became the birthplace of the contemporary Indigenous art movement. in the 1970s.
-- The People painted ancient stories of the *Dreaming in Aboriginal culture.
-- The Dreaming (Tjukurpa) is a term used by Aborigines to describe the relations and balance between the spiritual, natural and moral elements of the world. Its meaning goes beyond any suggestion of a spiritual or dream-related state.
-- These stories pertained to the land and law taught to the people by the Ancestors.
-- The imagery previously used on ritual objects, in body designs, and ceremonial ground paintings, were used in these acrylic paintings.
-- The Luritja, Pintupi, Warlpiri and Anmatyerr men used acrylic paint on board and canvas. The earliest form of acrylic paint was first called synthetic polymer.
-- Today, Aboriginal women also produce Western Desert paintings. They often have fathers, brothers and husbands who are also such artists.
-- In the 1970s and onward, the land rights and outstation movement took place, whereby Aboriginal people moved back to their homelands. They then painted aspects of their homelands.
-- Aboriginal Art Board was created in 1973. It promoted Indigenous art to a wider commercial art audience.
-- Government-funded Aboriginal Art Centers were created. Their sole purpose was to support, encourage, and facilitate the development of Aboriginal art in remote regions.
-- The new community of Kintore was established about 155 miles west of Papunya in the early 1980s, which was a substantial improvement over Papunya.
-- The above changes moved Australian Indigenous art out of the sole venue of ethnographic museums.
-- Australian Indigenous art entered the fine arts world and was collected by fine arts museums and private collectors. This continues to today.
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218 pages
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