Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)

Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
Acme Bus Corporation – 6th Grade SBAC Math Performance Task (PT)
File Type

PDF

(1 MB|27 pages)
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Standards
Also included in:
  1. The purpose of the 6th Grade SBAC Performance Task Bundle is to familiarize students with math performance tasks in preparation for standardized testing. This bundle includes eight tasks, with six versions of each task. Each task covers 6th Grade Common Core Standards and has a multitude of applicat
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  2. The purpose of the Middle School SBAC Performance Task Bundle is to familiarize students with math performance tasks in preparation for standardized testing. This bundle includes 26 tasks, with six versions of each task. Each task covers 6th, 7th, & 8th Grade Common Core Standards with a multitu
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  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

The purpose of the Acme Bus Corporation – SBAC Performance Task is to familiarize students with math performance tasks in preparation for standardized testing. This task has a multitude of applications. There are six versions of the task, each has the same context but different numbers. You can use these as class activities, proficiency practice, or quizzes. These tasks provide excellent practice for STARR testing and other state exams.

This task gives students an opportunity to develop, describe, and solve multi-step real world problems involving variables and rational numbers. Students will create and use expressions and equations to determine the best price given specific parameters. Students will exhibit competence with math content standards 6.EE.A.2, 6.EE.A.3, 6.EE.A.4, 6.EE.B.5, 6.EE.B.6, 6.NS.B.2, 6.NS.B.3, and mathematical practices standards MP1, MP2, MP3, MP6, and MP7.

The following downloads are included with this product:

- Instructions for teachers

- Acme Bus Corporation SBAC Performance Task (6 versions)

- Acme Bus Corporation Answer Key (6 versions)

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Absolute Value

Wendy Petty

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For more Project Based Learning with Mathematics available at my store: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Absolute-Value. This project was created and provided by Absolute Value.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Total Pages
27 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 hour
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