Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction

Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Addition and Subtraction Game for Differentiating Instruction
Common Core State Standards
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Product Description
Included in this 24 page document:
- Set up/How to play
- Common Core Standards addressed
- 4 Spinner mats (counting on and back 1, 2 and 3; adding and subtracting tens; adding and subtracting hundreds; and a blank spinner with endless possibilities for differentiation (multiplication, only addition, only subtraction, etc.) Great for Special Education and Gifted and Talented students!
- 3 game boards for different lengths of games (15 spaces, 10 spaces, 5 spaces). You can choose the five space board for younger students and students who take longer making calculations. For older children, for a longer time period or for children who are quick at calculating, the 15 space board might be best.
- 8 pages of number cards - red is for kindergarten or first grade students, orange for first grade and second grade students, green and blue for second grade students. (The cards can be mixed and matched with the game boards to create many possible games.)
- 1 number card template for the teacher to make different number cards if desired.
- Recording sheet for 2 player games
- 2 Recording sheets for 3 players (front and back)
- 100 chart
- 101-200 chart


Set up -
Print game boards, spinner mats, and number cards onto cardstock.
Cut out number cards. Decide which number cards will be used for pairs/trios of students based on their level.
Laminate or use sheet protectors as desired.
Gather 2-3 game pieces to be used (connecting cubes or other small objects.)
Add a spinner, or a pencil and paperclip, to the game box/folder.

How to play -
Shuffle number cards and place face down on the rectangle labeled “Number cards.” Each player chooses a game piece and places it on the space labeled “Start.”
Each player takes a number card and spins the spinner. Student will make a number sentence based on the card and where the spinner lands and will record it on the “Recording Sheet.” For example, if the student picks the number 36 and the spinner lands on - 10, they will write the equation 36-10 on the recording sheet.
Students each solve their equation finding the sum or difference. Students may need to use manipulatives or tools to solve the equation. (whiteboard and dry erase markers, Base Ten blocks, the 100 and 200 charts, etc.) If the student chooses a number card (minuend) that is a smaller than the subtrahend (number subtracted), then they should simply write an X as the answer. For example, 12 - 20= X.
Students record the sum or difference of their equation. Students compare their numbers. The student with the greatest number will move one space on the game board. If students tie, they can both move one space. If a student lands on a space that tells them to move ahead ___ spaces, they should immediately move ahead that many spaces. The first student to reach the “Finish” wins! If the number cards run out, simply shuffle them and reuse them.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns!
Jennifer Keddie de Cojon - 1st grade teacher


Common Core Standards:
Kindergarten:
Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).
Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings1, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
First Grade:
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Work with addition and subtraction equations.
Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.
Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Second Grade:
Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.2 By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.
Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.
Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.
Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900.
Total Pages
24 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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