African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides

African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
African American Art History - aka Black Negro Art - 205 Slides
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This is a complete presentation about African American, or Black American, Art History. THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES IN THE PREVIEW FOR YOUR REVIEW. THIS IS YOUR BEST GUIDE TO PRODUCT QUALITY.

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EXCERPT
GREAT MIGRATION: As life in the South during the Reconstruction, in the later 1800s, became increasingly difficult for the freed slaves, many African Americans migrated north. Likewise, many who were part of the Harlem Renaissance came into Harlem with that same migration.

People of African descent from the Caribbean also migrated to the same places in the North and Midwest. They also came together in Harlem in time to join the Harlem Renaissance of the arts.

Harlem was originally an exclusive suburb for the white middle and upper middle classes. As European immigrants poured into New York during the late 19th century, the whites moved further north, leaving Harlem open for some other group.

Harlem became an African-American neighborhood in the early 1900s. Many more African Americans arrived in Harlem during the First World War.

The first stage of the Harlem Renaissance started in the late 1910s in the theater by staging shows with African-American actors playing characters with complex human emotions and yearnings. Blackface and minstrel show traditions were rejected.

The movement spread to all of the art forms from there.

The New Negro was the key factor to the Harlem Renaissance. This person had intellect. Through creating literature, art, and music, this New Negro challenged racism and stereotypes.

There was no one uniting form or style to the Harlem Renaissance. It had diverse styles, almost a Pan-African perspective. Music, including blues and jazz, flowed from it. “Porgy and Bess” was staged by George Gershwin during it with an all black cast.

Some of these people were artists and their work was shown too, although the art movement was slower than the musical one to take hold.

Norman Lewis was part of this movement and he would edge his way into Abstract Expressionism, which emerged in the later 1940s. In the 1950s and 1960s, few African-American artists were widely known or accepted. But some did make it into important New York galleries. These were: Horace Pippin, Jacob Lawrence, William T. Williams, Norman Lewis, Thomas Sills, and Sam Gilliam.
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205 pages
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