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Interactive resources you can assign in your digital classroom from TpT.
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Easel Activities
Pre-made digital activities. Add highlights, virtual manipulatives, and more.
Easel Assessments
Quizzes with auto-grading that will be available for purchase on TpT soon.
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Algebra 2 Semester 1 Final Exam

Grade Levels
9th - 12th, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • Word Document File
Pages
11 pages
$3.50
$3.50
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Description

A comprehensive first semester exam covering linear equations, quadratics, polynomials, word problems, transformations, and simplifying radicals. Can be used for honors classes or tailored to lower level Algebra 2 classes. The first section is composed of multiple choice questions designed to help students develop a conceptual and verbal approach as well as prepare for common standardized tests such as the EOC here in Florida or the SAT and ACT. Perfect for homeschool curricula. It can also be used as a pre-exam study guide for your own test or part of a review packet at the end of the year. Purchase now to take advantage of the price - it will go up once the answer key is included.

Total Pages
11 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
1 Semester
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table).
Use the process of factoring and completing the square in a quadratic function to show zeros, extreme values, and symmetry of the graph, and interpret these in terms of a context.
Graph linear and quadratic functions and show intercepts, maxima, and minima.

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