American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle

American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
American Revolutionary War - Weapons - The Kentucky Rifle
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Product Description
This is a 19 slide, highly animated, power point presentation on the American Revolutionary War – The Kentucky Rifle. Each of the slides are editable so you can modify the slides to the presentation as needed.

Our Founding Fathers were adamant about the right of the people to keep and bear arms. They believed that an armed citizenry was essential to the preservation of freedom. Once disarmed, a people either submitted meekly to tyrants or fought in vain. So strong was the belief in “the right to bear arms” that the Founding Fathers wrote it into the United States Constitution.

Owning a gun was also practical, since most families used firearms to hunt game to feed their families. These skills were essential later as the American rebels were men who had grown up using firearms as part of their daily lives. This was especially true on the frontier, where young boys were taught the use of the finest weapon of the era, the Kentucky rifle. By the time they were teenagers, these young men were crack shots whom the family depended upon to hunt game for food and to repel Indian attacks.This is a 19 slide, highly animated, power point presentation on the American Revolutionary War – The Kentucky Rifle. Each of the slides are editable so you can modify the slides to the presentation as needed.

Our Founding Fathers were adamant about the right of the people to keep and bear arms. They believed that an armed citizenry was essential to the preservation of freedom. Once disarmed, a people either submitted meekly to tyrants or fought in vain. So strong was the belief in “the right to bear arms” that the Founding Fathers wrote it into the United States Constitution.

Owning a gun was also practical, since most families used firearms to hunt game to feed their families. These skills were essential later as the American rebels were men who had grown up using firearms as part of their daily lives. This was especially true on the frontier, where young boys were taught the use of the finest weapon of the era, the Kentucky rifle. By the time they were teenagers, these young men were crack shots whom the family depended upon to hunt game for food and to repel Indian attacks. The Kentucky rifle was an expertly crafted tool that no frontier family was without.

It was actually made in PA, not KY; the towns of Lancaster and Reading were particularly important centers of production. First called the “long rifle” because of its long barrel, the firearm later became known as the Kentucky because many famous frontiersmen, including Daniel Boone, used it on their hunting trips into that state.

Shooting contests were regularly staged all along the colonial frontier, from VT to GA. At 70 paces, marksmen could “snuff the candle” or “drive the nail.” In snuffing-the-candle, the lead ball from the rifle would have to pass through the flame of a burning candle, blowing out the flame but striking neither the wick nor the candle. In driving-the-nail, the lead ball would have to strike the head of a nail and drive it further into a post. Most American frontiersmen became deadeyes and could accomplish shooting feats such as snuffing-the-candle or driving-the-nail as a matter of course.

The British marveled at the marksmanship of these riflemen during the Revolutionary War, calling them “widow-makers.” The settlers of western VA (KY), TN and NC soon gained a reputation for hardy independence and rifle marksmanship as a way of life. The Kentucky was the weapon not only in the Battles of Saratoga, but the Battle of Cowpens, the War of 1812 the Battle of New Orleans and by the Texans in their War for Independence from Mexico.

The presentation covers the following:

Introduction
Background
The Kentucky
The Craftsmen
It’s Advantages
Marksmen
Firing the Rifle (2)
Reloading the Rifle
“Widow Makers”
Predatory Warfare
Henry Beaufoy Quote
Timothy Murphy
Daniel Morgan
Rifling
Legacy of the Kentucky
End of Presentation

This is one of many power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading.... the American Revolutionary War.

Total Pages
19 slides
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
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