Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Fleeting Grace

Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
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12.59 MB   |   15 pages

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This presentation for higher education students is part of a new series; Rhythm, Rhyme and Reason Dynamic Learning!

Come and join interdisciplinary artist/author Tim Hazell as he traces a line from ethnic cultures and their visions in painting, sculpture, clothing , poetry, native philosophy, humanist thought and the bold experiments of European innovators.

Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivisn - Native Artistry, Fleeting Grace, is a concentrated 15-page learning module that gives students an exciting introduction to movements in nineteenth and early twentieth century art that were influences by so-called "primitive" cultures and their artistic traditions.

Native art draws admiration for its eternal truths which can be found in all cultures. To the sensitive eye, these aesthetic qualities may appear to exist independently from their milieu. This assumption does not account for critical standards indigenous peoples apply to the products of their craftsmanship. Much of the criteria used by healers and shaman to evaluate works such as sand paintings and masks developed as the growing uniqueness of their vocations set them apart from community life.

One of the artist’s practical objectives in any society is to communicate and arouse sympathetic response. In native tribes the artist’s freedom to conceptualize is restricted by forces of tradition and religion that modify vision to suit established doctrines and formula. Within these limitations or perhaps because of them native art reveals an extraordinary degree of individuality.

Neoprimitivism is limited to the conscious adaptions by sophisticated artists of authentic specimens of rustic craftsmanship. The first major artist to employ exotic patterns and motifs in his woodcuts and paintings was Paul Gauguin, and such works as his Mahana No Atua, painted during his stay in Tahiti, clearly reflect native influences.

Examples of Polynesian manufacture, such as oars, arrows and harpoons were collected by traders and shown at the Paris expositions of 1879 and 1889. Later expeditions to Africa brought back carved and inlaid wooden objects. Books on African sculpture began to appear, including the Golden Bough, a monumental 12-volume compendium of aboriginal folklore, magical practices and taboos.

‘Primitive’ art, with its complete negation of progress, seemed to embody the promise of a new beginning. The animistic philosophy of carvers who divined the spirit of wood and stone was expressed in grains, textures and shapes of their materials. German Expressionists were fascinated by the strange forms and anti-intellectualism of the images. French artists such as Matisse found a justification for abstract designs in their simplified geometry.

Rhythm, Rhyme and Reason's Dynamic Learning Series will offer a full range of "Information Modules," designed to bring out the maximum potential in group-related activities. Students are encouraged to approach the challenges of discussion, research and presentation with open minds and creative attitudes!
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Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee
Ancient Futures and Neoprimitivism: Native Artistry - Flee