Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 16-30/150

Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 16-30/150
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Supplement the textbook and eliminate preparation time with these 15 ready-to-use reproducible world history lessons focusing on Ancient Greece and Rome. Your students will enjoy a wide variety of high-interest activities for individuals, small groups, or the entire class.

Among many other fun things to do, class members will battle each other in the The Greek War Game with one half of the class representing Sparta and the other Athens, become playwrights of ancient Greece who write a comedy or tragedy for an upcoming festival in Athens, sharpen their critical thinking skills while analyzing the actions of Hannibal of Carthage, and complete a map exercise tracing the growth of Rome from a small town to a great empire.

Most lessons have three or four activity sheets and can be finished in one or two class periods. Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key (where applicable) provided for each lesson. A majority of the lessons include a 20-question follow-up quiz. The quizzes can also be given as homework assignments or review exercises. Most of the information-filled lessons are able to be used without a textbook.


LESSON/ACTIVITY TITLES (16-30 of 150)
16. The Greek War Game
17. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
18. The Golden Age of Athens
19. Comedy and Tragedy
20. The Hellenistic Age
21. The Romans
22. The Roman Republic
23. Reading: Hannibal of Carthage
24. To Tell The Truth: Julius Caesar
25. Map Exercise: The Roman Empire
26. Crosswits: Ancient Rome
27. The Roman Empire Game
28. Summary: Ancient Greece and Rome
29. Summary Test: Ancient Greece and Rome
30. The Middle Ages in Europe


Detailed descriptions of these lessons are provided below.


Bundle Discount
Individual lessons in this Ancient Greece and Rome bundle are also available for purchase separately. But purchasing all 15 here enables you to save $11.86 (19%).


LESSON 16. The Greek War Game

OBJECTIVE:
To study ways of living in ancient Greek city-states.

TIME:
1 class period

Students begin this activity by reading an outline describing the city-states of ancient Greece and the war that was fought between the two leading city-states, Sparta and Athens. Information on the outline is then used during the playing of “The Greek War Game.”

The class is divided into two teams, one representing Sparta and the other Athens. The two sides will fight against each other in the Peloponnesian War. A diagram on the third activity sheet represents the battlefield. It includes a map of ancient Greece which has been divided into 16 sections –– 1A, 1B, etc. Both Sparta and Athens have their army and navy “hidden” in various squares. Both occupy 8 spaces; a few spaces will contain both Spartans and Athenians.

Complete game rules are provided on the lesson pages, as well as the questions used to play the game.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 17. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle

OBJECTIVE:
To analyze the effect that Greek philosophers had on Western civilization.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson begins with a brief introduction about what a philosopher is, and how the first great ones were Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. This is followed by seven multiple-choice questions, each of which includes a conclusion that one of the three philosophers came to after studying mankind and the universe. As you read through the questions with the class, students are asked to decide which one of three sentences (a, b, or c) following each conclusion gives the correct meaning. Just prior to announcing the answer, you can ask how many people chose a, how many chose b, and how many chose c.

Next, students read through twelve statements by Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. They must choose three they agree with, and two they disagree with, and explain why in each case. Later in the period, you can ask for volunteers to read and give reasons for their responses.

To conclude the activity, students will finish four more sayings from Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle by putting their own words in blank spaces within each saying. Answers can be funny or serious. Some class members can be given a chance to read their sayings to the class.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 18. The Golden Age of Athens

OBJECTIVE:
To summarize the achievements of Greek civilization during the Golden Age of Athens.

TIME:
1 class period

After reading a brief introduction about the Golden Age of Athens, students review a chart that summarizes the following accomplishments made during this time in history.

• Philosophy
• Science and Mathematics
• Medicine
• Government
• Literature
• Architecture and Sculpture

Information from the chart is used later in the period during the playing of “The Olympic Games.” The class is divided into five teams which will represent the five city-states of Sparta, Athens, Corinth, Thebes, and Megara. Each city-state will compete in the ancient Olympic Games.

The games begin with the long jump. A question is asked about the Golden Age of Athens. The first person in class to raise their hand is called on. If their answer is correct, they win the “bronze medal” (symbolic of third place) in the long jump, and the team gets 4 points. More questions will then be asked as teams compete in the same way for second place (“silver medal” and 7 points) in the long jump, and first place (“gold medal” and 10 points) in the long jump.

Competition continues in the same way with other events. Questions on the fourth lesson page are used by the teacher to play the game. These can be handed out afterwards as a review sheet

Complete game rules are provided on the lesson pages.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 19. Comedy and Tragedy

OBJECTIVE:
To become involved in one of ancient Greece’s favorite pastimes.

TIME:
2 class periods

This neat activity begins by reading with the class a brief introduction about how the theater brought people together in Athens to witness plays called comedies and tragedies.

Each student is then given the assignment of assuming they are one of the leading playwrights of ancient Greece who has decided to write a play for the upcoming festival in Athens. The play will either be a comedy or tragedy, and deal with one of several subjects listed on the lesson page, such as warfare, education, government officials, etc.

It is important to make sure class members understand the idea of character parts and the organization of a play. More tips and guidelines to help students complete this assignment are provided in the directions for the assignment.

Plays can be completed for homework. You can advise interested students that if they wish to have their play read in class, they should choose willing people for the parts.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions with much more information about how best to conduct this lesson are included.


LESSON 20. The Hellenistic Age

OBJECTIVE:
To understand how Greek culture flourished and spread throughout the Mediterranean region during the reign of Alexander the Great and his successors.

TIME:
1 class period

The class is divided into two teams that take turns trying to identify missing words in a series of sentences about the Hellenistic Age. The number of letters in each answer can be seen, and some letters are given as clues. The sentences are arranged into four games.

In Game 1, a correct answer is worth 10 points. When a wrong answer is given, the other team has one try at answering the same question. If neither team guesses the missing word, then the teacher will announce it.

Play begins with a person from Team 1 raising their hand to identify the missing word in the first sentence. Team members may not talk over possible answers. The same person cannot answer twice in a row for their team. During each of the four games, Team 1 always has the first chance to answer the odd-numbered questions, and Team 2 the first chance on the even-numbered questions.

Games 2-4 are played in the same way, except point values increase by 10 with each game.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 21. The Romans

OBJECTIVE:
To trace the events that were part of the rise and fall of Ancient Rome.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson includes two contests based on an outline that summarizes important events during the years when Rome ruled a vast empire surrounding the Mediterranean Sea.

I. Geography helped Rome establish a great empire in the Mediterranean region.
II. The Romans gained control of Italy and set up a republic.
III. The Roman Republic gained lands throughout the Mediterranean region.
IV. The Roman Republic became the Roman Empire.

Start by reading with the class the introductory paragraph and parts I and II of the outline. Once finished, students will begin Contest #1 in which they must try to identify as many people, places, and terms as they can in a list of 28 using clues that are provided. A time limit should be set in accordance with the ability of the students. When time has elapsed, papers are exchanged and answers read.

For homework, have class members read parts III and IV of the outline and do Contest #2. Papers can be exchanged and corrected at the beginning of the next class period.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 22. The Roman Republic

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with political and social progress during the years of the Roman Republic.

TIME:
1 class period

You can begin this lesson by reading with the class three introductory paragraphs about how the Roman Republic came to be.

Students will next see a chart illustrating how the government in the early years of the Roman Republic had three branches –– the consuls, the Senate, and the Assembly. Each branch and its various powers is shown. After reading through this information, class members will answer a series of Chart Questions, as well as several Thought Questions, which help develop critical thinking skills.

Thought Question Example:
Before 509 B.C., Rome was ruled by a king. Then, the city established the Roman Republic with power divided among three branches of government. Why do you think the Romans preferred having a republic instead of a government ruled by a king?

The lesson concludes with the playing of THE GLADIATORS GAME! After reading a few paragraphs of background information about gladiators, volunteers from class will take part in make-believe duels.

Play begins with one gladiator matched against another. The teacher will ask a question about the Roman Republic (provided in the Teacher Instructions). The two combatants will look for answers on their lesson sheets. The first one to answer correctly wins the duel. The other person is “dead” on the Colosseum floor, and is out of the game. The winners of the round one duels will then be matched against each other in a second round. There will be more rounds until only one gladiator remains alive.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 23. Reading: Hannibal of Carthage

OBJECTIVE:
To appreciate the military genius of the man who posed the only real threat to Rome’s domination of the Mediterranean world at the height of its power.

TIME:
1 class period

As the teacher, you can begin this lesson by pointing out on a classroom map the locations of Carthage (present day Tunis) and Rome. Also, trace Hannibal’s route from southeastern Spain through southern Gaul (France) and across the Alps to Italy. Show the locations of the islands of Corsica, Sardinia, and Sicily.

Next, read with the class the story of Hannibal.

Students then answer six Thought Questions, which help develop critical thinking skills. Responses can be discussed later in the period.

Example Thought Question:
(2) Was Hannibal’s bold plan to invade Italy a good idea or a bad idea? Give a reason for your answer.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions included.


LESSON 24. To Tell The Truth: Julius Caesar

OBJECTIVE:
To study the life of Julius Caesar and the times in which he lived.

TIME:
1 class period

Choose three students to be Julius Caesar. Tell the three which one is the real Caesar (answer in Teacher Instructions), but do not inform the other class members.

Next, thirteen other students are chosen to ask one question each during the game. They will be assigned a number from 1 to 13. This is the number of the question they will ask when the game begins.

After every question, the three Julius Caesars will each give an answer. “Number 1” will always answer first, “Number 2” second, and “Number 3” third. Only one of the three is really Julius Caesar. The real one will always tell the truth when answering questions. The other two will only tell the truth once in awhile. After all questions have been asked, class members will vote for the person they think is the real Julius Caesar. When the voting is taking place, ask the kids to give reasons for their choice.

This game is played like a television game show. The teacher is the “MC,” or Master of Ceremonies. The people who ask questions are the “panelists.”

Once the TO TELL THE TRUTH game is finished, students will answer a series of true/false questions based on information they learned during game.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included.

MY EXPERIENCE USING TO TELL THE TRUTH GAMES:
At the beginning of the period, when I ask for the three class members to volunteer to be Julius Caesar, almost every hand goes up! I have found To Tell The Truth games to be very popular.


LESSON 25. Map Exercise: The Roman Empire

OBJECTIVE:
To trace the growth of Rome from being a small town to becoming the center of a great empire.

TIME:
1 class period

This activity is based around two map exercises for students to work on as they learn about the Roman Empire.

Map 1: Rome Becomes a Center for Trade
Class members use a map on the second lesson page to identify which countries or areas various products were imported to Rome from. Afterwards, class members must find and circle each of the products in a word search puzzle. This is followed by three Thought Questions that help develop critical thinking skills.

Map 2: Growth of the Roman Empire
A map on the fourth lesson page shows the highlights of the period of Roman expansion, which took place over hundreds of years and through dozens of wars. Students use the map to answer a series of 15 questions pertaining to the growth of the Roman Empire.


LESSON 26. Crosswits: Ancient Rome

OBJECTIVE:
To study ways of living among the citizens of Rome at the height of the Roman Empire.

TIME:
2 class periods

This lesson begins by reading with the class introductory paragraphs about Julius Caesar's adopted son, Octavian, whose rise to power happened after a brief civil war between his forces and supporters of Mark Antony and Cleopatra.

Next, in a section entitled Ways of Living in the Roman Empire, class members will see eight paragraphs describing life in the days of the Roman Empire.

• Growth of the Roman Empire
• The Rich
• The Poor
• Entertainment
• Slavery
• Science and Engineering
• Family Life
• Food and Clothing

Below each paragraph, students will draw one or more pictures that have something to do with the information found in the description. Each picture must show an aspect of life during Roman times. You may want to display some of the sketches or have volunteers put one or more of their pictures on the board.

CROSSWITS GAME
To conclude the activity, the class is divided into teams for the playing of CROSSWITS. Each team sits in a different row. Play begins when the teacher asks for a volunteer to choose any number from puzzle 1, such as “3 down” or “6 across.” A clue is then read which refers to a word or name mentioned on previous pages 1-3 of the lesson. The first person in class to raise their hand is allowed one guess at the answer. If their answer is correct, all class members will print the word or name in the appropriate spaces on the puzzle. One person on the team whose player answered correctly may then take one guess at what the puzzle is about –– for example, “Julius Caesar,” “gladiators,” or “upper class.” All of the words and names on the puzzle have something to do with the puzzle’s solution. If the guess at the solution is correct, that player’s team scores 10 points for each word yet to be filled in on the puzzle. Thus, if someone correctly guesses that the puzzle is about “Julius Caesar,” and four words have not yet been filled in, 40 points are scored. There is no penalty for an incorrect guess at the solution to the puzzle

Complete CROSSWITS game rules are provided on the lesson pages.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


LESSON 27. The Roman Empire Game

OBJECTIVE:
To review social, political, and economic aspects of life in the Roman Empire.

TIME:
1 class period

The lesson begins reading four paragraphs of background information with the class about how, in A.D. 395, the Roman Empire was divided into two parts, each having its own emperor.

The class is then divided into 5 teams for the playing of THE ROMAN EMPIRE GAME! Team 1 will be the Vandals, Team 2 the Franks, Team 3 the Anglo-Saxons, Team 4 the Huns, and Team 5 the Visigoths. The winner of the game will be the team of barbarians that is first to invade the empire and reach Rome.

Routes that teams will follow are shown on a map of Europe. The game begins when the teacher asks a question about the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. The first person to raise their hand is called on. If their answer is correct, all class members shade space 1 for the team that gave the right answer. But if that team’s answer is incorrect, everybody shades one space for each of the other 4 teams. Play continues until one team shades all 10 of its spaces and reaches Rome. In the event that two teams reach Rome at the same time, a tie-breaker question will be asked.

***IMPORTANT NOTE***
Prior to using the lesson, you will need to prepare a list of 35 to 40 questions that can be answered with the name of a person, place, event, or term. Questions can be based on previous lessons on Rome and/or on text readings, maps, and other illustrations.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions with additional information on how to conduct the game are included.


LESSONS 28-29. Summary and Test: Ancient Greece and Rome

OBJECTIVE:
To review the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, and measure each student's knowledge on the topic.

TIME:
Review sheets (provided) are given ahead of time for studying outside of class. Test takes 1 class period.

You can distribute the review sheets several days before the test. Students should use the study sheets to prepare for the exam during their own time outside of class. The summary reviews the following topics covered in world history lessons 16-27 of 150.

ANCIENT GREECE
• The City-States of Greece
• The Peloponnesian War
• The Hellenistic Age

ANCIENT ROME
• The Roman Republic
• The Roman Republic Becomes the Roman Empire

The test is the same summary that appeared on the review sheets, except with missing words, names, and terms.

Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 30. The Middle Ages in Europe

OBJECTIVE:
To provide an overview of the major events of the period of the Middle Ages.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson involves a fun and unique class game during which students are divided into two teams. Play begins when someone from Team 1 reads the first of 35 sentences, which are arranged into the following categories:

• The Middle Ages (400s to 1400s)
• Dark Ages (400s to 1000)
• Later Middle Ages (1000 to 1400s)

That person will then turn their paper face down and attempt to repeat the sentence exactly as it is written. If they can do this, their team scores either 10, 20, or 30 points. Points are underlined at the beginning of each sentence.

When a player fails to repeat the sentence word for word, everyone will circle the sentence number. The statement is now worth double the original number of points. The team whose turn is next can then attempt this sentence for double the points, or can choose the next sentence in the list. Complete game rules are provided on the lesson pages.

After the game, information in sentences 6 through 35 is used to answer a series of questions. Students must decide whether each description refers to the Dark Ages (DA) or Later Middle Ages (LMA). Class members will also see a list of 15 people and terms relating to the lesson topic that need to be identified/defined.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment or used as a review exercise later in the school year.


See Also...
15 Favorite Lessons: Early Civilizations, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 1-15/150
15 Favorite Lessons: The Middle Ages, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 31-45/150
15 Lessons: Renaissance/Reformation/Explor. WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 46-60/150
15 Lessons: New World/Europe in Transition, WORLD HISTORY CURRICULUM 61-75/150
Total Pages
81 pages
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