Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides

Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
Andy Warhol - Pop Art - Art History - 1960s-80s - NYC - 217 Slides
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This is a complete presentation on artist Andy Warhol from the Pop Art movement. THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW IN THE PREVIEW. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY.

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Robert Rauschenberg
Roy Lichtenstein
Pop Art
Op Art

EXCERPT, 15 MINUTES OF FAME
Andy Warhol’s version: He put the phrase in his program: "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” This was the 1968 exhibition of his work at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden. But this is 2 years after Nat’s version.

Photographer Nat Finkelstein’s version: He was photographing Warhol in 1966 (2 years earlier). Others tried to get into the picture and Warhol complained that everyone wanted to be famous. Finkelstein replied, "Yeah, for about fifteen minutes, Andy.”

EXCERPT, MYTHS
In 1981, Andy Warhol created a portfolio of 10 screen prints on Lenox Museum Board of fictional characters. The subjects mostly originated from old Hollywood movies and 1950’s and 60’s television shows. Several of these screen prints are also embellished with diamond dust.The prints were derived from already existing images except Warhol used models to create Santa Claus, Uncle Sam, and Mammy.

EXCERPT, Ten Portraits of Jews of the 20th Century
Hilton Kramer of "The New York Time": wrote at their first showing, “The way it exploits its Jewish subjects, without showing the slightest grasp of their significance, is offensive — or would be, anyway, if the artist had not already treated so many non-Jewish subjects in the same tawdry manner.” Other art critics were as negative.

The popular Jewish reception to these art works was entirely different from the above critical response. Jewish audiences who saw them in museums, galleries, and synagogues were very receptive and positive about the series.

Warhol liked their faces but knew little about many of them. He was not Jewish.

Warhol’s focus on fame, over all other aspects in his art works, has become of small importance now that he has been dead for over 30 years. His work is standing on its own without reference to that earlier obsession.
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217 pages
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