Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?

Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Assessing Reconstruction Primary Source Stations Freedom Achieved?
Grade Levels
Common Core Standards
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8 MB|38 (with answer key)
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  1. This BUNDLE includes 11 of my most popular stations activities from the first half of U.S. History. The Atlantic Slave Trade - Through this lesson,  students learn about the Atlantic Slave trade and the Middle Passage by visiting 5 stations that discuss Triangular Trade and the experience of enslave
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  2. Reconstruction - 4 separate lessons - discussions of the beginning and end of Reconstruction. Students will analyze whether African Americans really attained freedom through the Reconstruction Era. ☆☆☆Engaging, student centered, and make for the middle school mind!☆☆☆Click on the Previews to see det
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Product Description

With this stations activity, students access whether American Americans really gained freedom during the era of Reconstruction. 

By analyzing primary sources relating to six topics (Convict Leasing, Sharecropping, Building Black Communities, Black Leadership, Poll Taxes/Literacy Tests and the Black Codes), students see that the freedom was farther away than most assume. Students determine whether this circumstance lasted longer than the Reconstruction era, and then they add each event to a "spectrum of freedom." 

Students created a human spectrum across the classroom with each event, thus weighing the relative freedom of each circumstance. 

I saw so much thinking with this lesson! It was a fantastic experience in my classroom. 

Check out my other lessons from this era:

Slavery by Another Name

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You can find more Social Studies resources, links, and discussion at my blog - peacefieldhistory.com

Total Pages
38 (with answer key)
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
90 minutes
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