BUGBOOK VI Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing

BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
BUGBOOK  VI  Intro Experiments in Digital Electronics and 8080A Prog/Interfacing
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I revised the Bugbooks I-II-III group into the 1977 Bugbooks V and VI, which were based upon a superior trainer, namely, the MMD-1 microcomputer, which was designed by Dr. Jon Titus and marketed by E&L Instruments. The MMD-1 was designed in early spring, and Bugbooks V and VI first appeared as typewritten, individual, chapter modules – Modules One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, and Supplement – which were later consolidated during summer 1977 into typewritten Bugbooks V and VI. Why modules? Because I was a full-time faculty member of chemical engineering when the MMD-1 was first marketed. My book writing was confined only to weekends during the spring 1977 semester. For collectors of microcomputer material, the eight modules are rare. I wrote all of the modules, and thus, both Bugbooks V and VI.

The several years that passed between the publication of Bugbooks I and II (August 194) and Bugbook III (August 1975) made a big difference in the quality of Bugbooks V and VI (May 1977). Esoterica such as open-collector outputs, edge-triggered flip flops, LED displays, arithmetic units, and Schmitt triggers (Bugbook II) and status signals (Bugbook III) were omitted. The MMD-1 interfacing experiments focused only on latches, three-state buffers, and decoders.

The SK-50, single-step “LR Outboard” was created by David Larsen. This outboard permitted a student to single step through the cycles of an 8080A microprocessor integrated circuit. Single stepping through a program was a valuable teaching tool.

He also designed the LR-25 “LR Outboard”, which combined the functions of the power, logic switch, logic indicator, pulser, and latch/display individual Outboards. The LR-25 Outboard was my favorite; I used it all the time in my undergraduate and professional courses.

Like Bugbook III, the programming experiments in Bugbooks V and VI can be dry labbed. Used MMD-1 hardware is available on the Internet. I so not know how to search Google for used “LR Outboards”, auxiliary-function hardware. As microcomputer collector items, they are probably rare.

Bugbooks V and VI were organized as a series of twenty-three chapters:

1. Digital codes
2. An introduction to microcomputer programming
3. Some 8080 microcomputer instructions
4. The MMD-1 microcomputer
5. Some simple 8080 microcomputer programs
6. Registers and register instructions
7. Logic gates and truth tables
8. Logical instructions
9. An introduction to breadboarding
10. Integrated-circuit chips
11. Flip-flops and latches
12. Decoders
13. Counters
14. Gating digital signals
15. Astable and monostable multivibrators
16. What is interfacing?
17. Device select pulses
18. The 8080A instruction set
19. Data-bus techniques using three-state devices
20. An introduction to accumulator input/output
21. An introduction to memory-mapped input/output
22. Microcomputer input/output: some examples
23. Flags and interrupts
Appendices
References
Definitions for Bugbooks V and VI
LR Outboards
Octal/hex conversion table
Description of the MMD-1 Microcomputer
Equipment inventory for Bugbooks V and VI
Index

Bugbooks V and VI were my final Bugbooks. Bugbook IV – on the 8255 programmable peripheral interface IC – was already in draft form, but a falling out between myself and my colleagues led to its unethical publication by Paul Goldsborough, who listed himself as sole author and did not use the Bugbook IV title.

What about the “rest of the story” (the Paul Harvey quote)? My falling out led to a March 1979 lawsuit that I filed against my former colleagues. After much sturm and drang, this lawsuit was settled in June 1980. I recovered sole copyright, sole authorship, and sole royalty control of my Bugbooks I, II, IIA, III, V, and VI. My former colleagues retained control over the stuff that they coveted.

In 1982, I wrote Foxware Modules One, Two A, and Two B for the FOX microcomputer trainer, which was co-designed by myself and E&L Instruments. In my opinion, the Z80-based FOX microcomputer is the best microcomputer trainer ever designed.

With the appearance of the Intel 8088 microprocessor, personal computer technology moved rapidly from the era of hobby and laboratory microcomputers toward the era of the IBM personal computer plus add-in boards on the ISA bus. During the middle and late 1980s, my professional focus moved completely toward my two, junior-level, process control controls courses in the department of chemical engineering at Virginia Tech.
Total Pages
421 pages
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