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Balance Equations with Alexander Calder

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1 MB|5 pages
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Two Common Core Math Activities to support students’ understanding of balanced equations, addition, and number relationships. Two differentiated versions to challenge problem-solving at all levels!. Detailed lesson plan and printables included!

This activity is part of an Alexander Calder Artist Study, which is a portion of our complete Artist Biography Unit.

Go to this link to read a parent's testimony to the power and effectiveness of our
Artist Biography Unit:
http://goodmenproject.com/families/teaching-art-form-gmp/

Go go our store to find individual artist activities and complete
Artist Studies about the following artists: Michelangelo,
Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Alexander Calder,
Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, and Andy Goldsworthy.
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Ideas-For-Teaching

This learning experience is directly correlated with the Common Core State Standards:
Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.B.3 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.2 Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.C.6 Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Total Pages
5
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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