Ben Franklin’s Autobiography, Informational Text, Franklin Aphorisms, 13 Virtues

Laura Randazzo
57.5k Followers
Grade Levels
10th - 12th, Homeschool
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
  • Google Apps™
Pages
9-page PDF
$3.00
$3.00
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Laura Randazzo
57.5k Followers
Includes Google Apps™
The Teacher-Author indicated this resource includes assets from Google Workspace (e.g. docs, slides, etc.).

Description

Use this two-day lesson pack to get your teens excited about studying the words and ideas of Benjamin Franklin, one of the United States’ most compelling founding fathers.

This 9-page download (PDF + Google Drive version of all student handouts):

• Detailed, step-by-step lesson procedure suggestions

• Brainstorming handout to help students create their own definition of a successful person

• Four-page excerpt of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

• Critical-thinking question handout that requires students to dig back into Benjamin Franklin’s informational text and their own minds to find the answers

• Detailed answer keys for all questions, designed to make grading easy and help you guide class discussion

• Team activity involving 20 of Benjamin Franklin’s well-known aphorisms from Poor Richard’s Almanac

Click HERE for more high-interest informational text lessons.

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Cover image credit: Markus Volodymyr, WikiMedia Commons, Public domain

Total Pages
9-page PDF
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
2 days
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address, the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”), including how they address related themes and concepts.
By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

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