Betsy Ross: Fact or Fiction? U.S. History Reader's Theater

Grade Levels
4th - 7th
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
  • Activity
Pages
13 pages
$3.75
$3.75
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Easel Activity Included
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Description

The history of the flag of the United States is a compelling story, but historians are divided as to the facts. Did Betsy Ross really create the first flag? This play, which was originally published in my book, Read Aloud Plays: Symbols of America, and later reprinted in the January 2002 issue of Scholastic's Storyworks magazine, encourages readers to become history sleuths. It includes the play script, a short reading supplement, a bubble quiz, a comprehension activity built around William Canby's 1870 treatise on the matter. Suitable for reader's theater or full stage production, use it with students in grades 4 through 7 (and potentially 3 - 8) to build fluency and to satisfy a variety of Common Core standards in Literature and Informational Text.

This play is suddenly important, not because of Betsy Ross, but because we're going through an era in which there seems to be a lot of misinformation about flag etiquette and the flag's true meaning. Happy directing!

Total Pages
13 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

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