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Brown Vs. Board of Education How Does Segreation Affect Education?

Brown Vs. Board of Education How Does Segreation Affect Education?
Brown Vs. Board of Education How Does Segreation Affect Education?
Brown Vs. Board of Education How Does Segreation Affect Education?
Brown Vs. Board of Education How Does Segreation Affect Education?
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This fact file connects brown vs, the board of education to our world

CONNECT TO YOUR WORLD
Use the data in the table to create a graph, and describe the trend that you see. Then, research school segregation today. Have schools become more or less segregated since 2001? What might explain this change?


School Desegregation After Brown
Percentage of African Americans students in 90 percent minority schools
1968 1988 1991 2001
South 78 24 26 31
Northeast 43 48 50 51
Midwest 58 42 40 47
West 51 29 27 30
Source: National Center for Education Statistics Common Core of Data



BACKGROUND:
Until the 1950s, many public schools through the United States were segregated by race. This separation for students was legal because of the 1898 Plessy vs. Ferguson decision, in which the Supreme Court ruled that “separate but equal” facilities did not violate the Constitution. However, many believed that segregated schooled could never provide an equal education.

The Facts The Issue The Decision
• Linda Brown was an African American student in the segregated school district of Topeka, Kansas
• Linda’s parents tried to enroll her in an all-white school closer to home, but school officials denied the application on the basis of race
• The NAACP filed a lawsuit against the Board of Education on behalf of the Brown and several other black families • The NAACP argues that segregated schools deprived African American students the equal protection of the law required by the Fourteenth Amendment The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that segregated schools were inherently unequal and violated the Fourteenth Amendment


WHY IT MATTERS
Brown vs. Board of Education was an important first legal victory in the civil rights movement. This landmark decision brought America one step closer to securing equal rights for all. Chief Justice Earl Warren declared that segregation in education was unconstitutional because it prevented an equal education for all races”

“In these days, it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if he is denied the opportunity of an education. Such an opportunity… is a right which must be made available to all on equal terms… To separate them (Children in grade and high schools) from others of similar age and qualifications solely because of their race generates a feeling of inferiority… that may affect their hearts and minds in a way unlike to ever be undone…”
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