Building Bar Models Addition and Subtraction Task Cards (3 Levels)

Amber Thomas
2.3k Followers
Grade Levels
1st - 3rd
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
61 pages
$3.00
$3.00
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Amber Thomas
2.3k Followers

Description

Do your students need more practice with bar models? This construction themed set of task cards uses hands on practice for kids who need support before drawing those models on their own. It is also differentiated to a variety of learners because it contains 3 sets in one: 1 digit, 2 digit, and 3 digit numbers. All your students can practice the same problem solving skills with cards that look the same, but you can be sure they working with cards on their level!

This product contains:
✅ 12 cards with 1 digit numbers, 12 with 2 digits, and 12 with 3 digit numbers
✅ Manipulative sets (cutting and sorting into envelopes is required preparation unless you want your students to draw the bar models)
✅ Self correcting “answer pages” for every card
✅ Recording sheets for all 3 levels

Are you looking for more math products? Check out these popular activities
Fraction of a Set Task Cards Bundle of 3
Place Value Bundle
Math Problem Solving Game: Now or Later
Long Division Task Card Centers Bundle

Clipart credit: Among others, this product uses the work of Digi Clip Art

Total Pages
61 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 hour
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

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