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Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power

Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Bundle- Argument Lessons on Political Power
Product Description
Finding teaching materials to teach the theme of political power is difficult. This bundle provides five comprehensive argument lessons with a variety of culminating assessments. Each lesson individually is $4.00 but is bundled together here for $9.99. The product is available as a zipfile and each lesson is in .PDF form.

Click on the links to the individual lessons to see preview files.
-Practice with Argument: Abigail Adams’s “Letter to John Quincy Adams”
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These lessons examine the idea of motherhood, fatherhood and raising children to reach their potential. An NPR “Talk of the Nation” episode explains Abigail’s influence as mother, wife, and politician. A Ted Talk explains the 21st Century challenges of being an excellent parent. There are multimedia clips linked from HBO’s John Adams and 1776 the Musical.

The teaching notes link to the College Board’s AP Central site where the 2014 AP English Language Question #2 is a perfect fit to use when assessing this unit. Students will analyze Abigail Adams’s letter to her son. Links to the rubric, the essay, the prompt, and student samples can be found here. Expert analysis for the essay scores is also provided. Complete Common Core standards are included. Essential and key questions, links to video clips and resources are also included. All lessons have an opening, work session, and closing structure. A unique detailed rubric can be used to score Socratic Seminars in a way that encourages organic fluid discussions accompanies the lesson plan. In the guide, there is a step by step explanation on how to conduct a fish-bowl discussion with the rubric.

-Practice with Argument: Martin Luther King’s, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”
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Using Martin Luther King’s, “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” students will review important rhetorical devices and appeals, close read and annotate the text, view supporting video clips, listen to an NPR story, view a TED TALK on modern day civil disobedience, view the writing prompt, and examine a student sample. There is also a link to AP Multiple Choice questions and an answer key that uses King’s essay. There is a color-coded sample of “Letter from Birmingham Jail" available. There is also an opportunity to write a Rhetorical Précis, as well as supporting material for teaching this activity to your students.

-Practice with Argument: Margaret Thatcher’s Eulogy for Ronald Reagan
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Using Margaret Thatcher’s “Eulogy for Ronald Reagan,” students will review important rhetorical devices and appeals; close read and annotate the text; view supporting video clips such as a 1980s SNL skit and a 2013 Bill Maher rant on Reagan; listen to several NPR stories; and view a comparison performance between Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher and Margaret Thatcher (herself) in the House of Commons. Students will view a TED TALK on the lessons of Reagan’s Trickle down economics, and examine the writing free response task for the 2016 AP English Language exam prompt on Thatcher’s Eulogy for Reagan. A recent Atlantic Monthly article that features Reagan’s influence on today’s candidates is available. There is also an opportunity to write a Rhetorical Précis, as well as supporting material for teaching this rhetorical analysis to your students.

-Practice with Argument: The Great Gatsby and Chris Hedges on the Rich 1%
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This resource has a link to Hedges’ article originally publish on Truthdig.org. There is also a video link with Hedges discussing these ideas to assist students in understanding his argument. This assignment can be conducted in a study of The Great Gatsby or independent of reading the book. It focuses on recognizing the rhetorical appeals in Hedges’ article. There is a link to and guide written to show a 12 minute segment of Woody Allen’s 2011 film Midnight in Paris, where a 21st Century character travels to 1920s Paris.

-Practice with Argument: Niccolò Machiavelli’s “The Morals of a Prince.”
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Using Niccolò Machiavelli’s “The Morals of a Prince,” students will review important rhetorical devices and appeals; close read and annotate the text; view supporting video clips; listen to an NPR story; view a TED TALK on Machiavelli; evaluate the writing prompt; and examine scored student sample essays from a link to the 2008B English Language and Composition prompt on dissent and disagreement. A link is provided to AP Multiple Choice questions and an answer key that uses Machiavelli’s essay. There is also an opportunity to complete a SOAPSTone graphic organizer, as well as supporting material for teaching this piece to your students.
Total Pages
75 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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$9.99
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