Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings

Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Bundle of 2 - Landmark Supreme Court Cases - Separate But Equal Rulings
Product Rating
4.0
3 ratings
File Type

Compressed Zip File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

1 MB|27 slides
Share
Product Description
This is a bundle of 2 highly animated, power point presentations on Landmark Supreme Court Cases involving the "separate but equal" clause. Landmark Supreme Court Cases are those cases whose rulings have had far reaching impact on citizen rights in the United States. Both presentations together number 27 slides. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change them to fit your individual needs.

Plessy was a 30-year-old shoemaker in New Orleans and political activist. In 1891, he was a member of a citizen group who decided to test the Constitutionality of the Separate Car Act.

In 1892, the Louisiana Supreme Court declared the statue to be unconstitutional for interstate travel. Encouraged the committee wanted to challenge the stature for intrastate travel…..thus the challenge was set in motion. Critically important to the legal team is Plessy's color. He is "seven eighths Caucasian and one eighth African blood.” He is victim of the “one drop rule" that a person with any African blood, no matter how little, is considered to be black. Plessey's particular "mixture of colored blood" means it is "not discernible" to the naked eye. He is black by definition only!

On June 7, 1892, Plessy purchased a train ticket on the East Louisiana local, taking his seat on board in the "whites only" car. When the train conductor, asks Plessy what all conductors have been trained to ask under Louisiana's 2-year-old Separate Car Act, "Are you a colored man?" -- Plessy answered "Yes," prompting him to be ordered to the "colored car.” Plessy did not comply and was removed from the train by force and arrested. Plessy's answer started off a chain of events that led the Supreme Court to read "separate but equal" into the Constitution in 1896, thus allowing racially segregated accommodations to become the law of the land.

The US Supreme Court ruled that the law was a reasonable exercise of the state’s police powers based upon custom, usage, and tradition in the state. Yes. The states can constitutionally enact legislation requiring persons of different races to use “separate but equal” segregated facilities.

Power point presentation #1 is entitled, Landmark Supreme Court Case - Plessy v. Ferguson contains 12 slides and covers the following:

Who is Homer Plessy?
The “one drop” rule
Events Leading up to the Lawsuit
Events Leading up to the Lawsuit (cont)
Jim Crow Laws
The Constitutional Issue
Decision of the Supreme Court
Impact of the Supreme Court's Decision
Did the Supreme Court Get it Right?
What if Racial Segregation Never Ended?

Oliver Brown, was a parent, a welder in the shops of the Santa Fe Railroad, an assistant pastor at his local church, and an African American. Brown's daughter Linda, a 3rd grader, had to walk 6 blocks to her school bus stop to ride to Monroe Elementary, her segregated black school 1 mile away, while Sumner Elementary, a white school, was 7 blocks from her house.

As directed by the NAACP leadership, the parents each attempted to enroll their children in the closest neighborhood school in the fall of 1951. They were each refused enrollment and directed to the segregated schools.

For much of the 60 years preceding the Brown case, race relations, in the U.S. had been dominated by racial segregation. This policy had been endorsed in 1896, by the United States Supreme Court case of Plessy v. Ferguson, which held that as long as the separate facilities for the separate races were equal, segregation did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment ("no State shall... deny to any person... the equal protection of the laws.").

The plaintiffs in Brown asserted that this system of racial separation, while masquerading as providing separate but equal treatment of both white and black Americans, instead perpetuated inferior accommodations, services, and treatment for black Americans. The District Court ruled in favor of the Board of Education, citing the U.S. Supreme Court precedent set in Plessy v. Ferguson.

After Justice Warren was confirmed by Congress, he presented to them the simple argument that the only reason to sustain segregation was an honest belief in the inferiority of Negroes. Warren argued that the Court must overrule Plessy to maintain its legitimacy as an institution of liberty, and it must do so unanimously to avoid massive Southern resistance. Warren drafted the basic opinion and kept circulating and revising it until he had an opinion endorsed by all the members of the Court.

Power point presentation #2 is entitled, Landmark Supreme Court Case - Brown v. Board of Education contains 15 slides and covers the following:

Who are the Browns?
The Local Parents
Events Leading up to the Lawsuit
Events Leading up to the Lawsuit (cont)
School Segregation Map
Events Leading up to the Lawsuit (cont)
The District Court Ruling
The Supreme Court Review
The Opinions of the Court
Decision of the Supreme Court
Impact of the Supreme Court's Decision
Did the Supreme Court Get it Right?

This is one of many bundled power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading.... Landmark Supreme Court Cases.
Total Pages
27 slides
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
Report this Resource
Loading...
$5.29
Digital Download
avatar

Alta's Place

98 Followers
Follow
More products from Alta's Place
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
$5.29
Digital Download
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign up