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Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts

Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Bundle of 2 - Reconstruction Amendments & the Civil Rights Acts
Product Description
This is a bundle of 2 highly animated, power point presentations on the Civil Rights Movement – The Reconstruction Amendments & The Civil Rights Acts of 1964 & 1965. Both presentations together number 36 slides. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change them to fit your individual needs.

Power point #1 is entitled, Reconstruction - The Reconstruction Amendments and contains 27 slides and covers the following:

The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, passed between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War. This group of Amendments are sometimes referred to as the Civil War Amendments.

The Amendments were intended to restructure the United States from a country that was "half slave and half free" (Abraham Lincoln) to one in which the constitutionally guaranteed "blessings of liberty" would be extended to the entire populace, including the former slaves and their descendants.

The laws that came out of these amendments were not popular in the south and the Southern states often circumvented these laws or just did not implement them, beginning a Civil Rights struggle that lasted for more than 100 years in the United States.

Overview (2)
Nineteenth Amendment
Erosion of Federal Law
Supreme Court Decisions
Who Was Jim Crow?
Thirteenth Amendment
Slaves Legal Status?
Black Code Laws
Fourteenth Amendment
Forced Ratification
Important Clauses
Debate on Apportionment
Due Process Clause
Equal Protection Clause
Civil Rights & Voting Rights
Fifteenth Amendment
Protecting the Black Voter
Difficult Ratification
Laws to Disfranchise
Voter Suppression
Supreme Court Ruling
Southern States Respond
Other Laws Passed
End of Presentation

Power point #2 is entitled, The Civil Rights Movement - The Civil Rights Act of 1964 & the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and contains 24 slides and covers the following:

The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, is considered one of the crowning legislative achievements of the civil rights movement. First proposed by President John F. Kennedy, it survived strong opposition from southern members of Congress and was then signed into law by Kennedy’s successor, Lyndon B. Johnson. In subsequent years, Congress expanded the act and passed additional legislation aimed at bringing equality to African Americans, such as the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

State and local enforcement of the Voting Rights Act was weak and it often was ignored outright, mainly in the South and in areas where the proportion of blacks in the population was high and their vote threatened the political status quo. The Voting Rights Act gave African-American voters the legal means to challenge voting restrictions and vastly improved voter turnout. In MS alone, voter turnout among blacks increased from 6% in 1964 to 59% in 1969.

Since its passage, the Voting Rights Act has been amended to include such features as the protection of voting rights for non-English speaking American citizens.

Section 1: The Civil Rights Act of 1964
Introduction
Background
Reconstruction’s Failure
Kennedy Decides to Act
Johnson Takes Up the Cause
Strong House Resistance
Strong Senate Resistance
Adopted: July 2, 1964!
Provisions of the Act
The “Second Emancipation”
More Civil Rights Gains
Section 2: The Voting Rights Act of 1965
Background
Johnson Elected President
Selma Attacks
Johnson Takes Action
Literacy Tests
Adopted: August 6, 1965!
Provisions of the Act
Legacy of the Act
End of Presentation

This is one of many power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading.... The Civil Rights Movement.
Total Pages
36 slides
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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