Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services

Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
Bundle of 2 - Wild Bill Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services
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  1. This is a 28 slide, highly animated power point presentation on World War II – “Wild Bill” Donovan – Head of the OSS and Founder of the CIA. Each of the slides are editable, so you can modify those to meet your individual needs. In the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the na
  2. This is a 30 slide, highly animated, power point presentations on World War II - The Office of Strategic Services. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change it to fit your individual needs. The Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was formed for the purpose of obtaining informat
Bundle Description
This is a bundle of 2 highly animated power point presentation on World War II – “Wild Bill” Donovan – Head of the OSS and Founder of the CIA and on the Office of Strategic Services. The total number of slides is 58. Each of the slides are editable, so you can modify those to meet your individual needs.

Power point presentation #1 is entitled, “Wild Bill” Donovan – Head of the OSS and Founder of the CIA and contains 28 slides.

In the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the nation was in a state of shock and horror. The day after the attack, the United States officially declared war on Japan, with Nazi Germany declaring war on the United States three days later.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt realized that to win the war, the country needed an organization to gather important intelligence from around the world. The president’s advisors knew just the man to lead such an outfit — General William J. Donovan, also known as “Wild Bill” Donovan.

Eager for military service, Donovan joined the New York National Guard in 1912 as a captain. He became part of the “Silk Stocking Boys,” who chased the Mexican bandit Pancho Villa along the Rio Grande then excelled in service during World War I. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of the Marne and the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation’s second-highest award in 1918. Donovan was wounded in action 3 times during World War I. By the end of the war, Donovan had been promoted to colonel and was one of the most decorated soldiers of World War I.

Donovan’s extensive travel experience brought him to the attention of President Roosevelt, who asked him to visit England as an unofficial envoy in November 1940 to interview British officials and determine if they could withstand Nazi German. Donovan realized that the United States needed a centralized means of collecting foreign intelligence. Donovan returned to Washington and shared what he had learned with President Roosevelt, “bitten by” the world of intelligence gathering.

On July 11, 1941, President Roosevelt established the Office of the Coordination of Information (COI) and named Donovan as its director. This marked the time when Donovan became known as the “Father of American Intelligence.” The COI was tasked with coordinating information collected abroad for the president. After the United States became involved in World War II, the COI became the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) in June 1942, with Donovan still in charge.

By the end of the War, Donavan had made the way for the creation of the Central Intelligence Agency. “Wild Bill” Donovan was the only American to have received the nations four highest awards: The Medal of Honor, The Distinguished Service Cross, The Distinguished Service Medal and The National Security Medal. After his death, Donovan was awarded the Freedom Award of the International Rescue Committee. He is also a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame.

Quote re: Bill Donavan
Introduction
World War I
“Wild Bill”
Distinguished Service Cross
Medal of Honor
Decorated War Hero
The Law & Politics
The Intelligence Bug
No Formal Spy Agency
“The Room”
Establishing the OSS
Recruiting America’s Finest
Opposition to the OSS
Pearl Harbor Attack
Getting to Work
Pros & Amateurs
Donovan’s Vision
Donovan’s Proposal
Life after WW II
Truman & Donovan
From OSS to CIA
Death & Recognition
The Nation’s Highest Awards
End of Presentation

Power point presentation #2 is entitled, World War II - The Office of Strategic Services and contains 30 slides.

The Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was formed to obtain information about and sabotaging the military efforts of enemy nations during World War II. It lasted from 1942–45. It was headed by William J. “Wild Bill” Donovan. With some 12,000 staff members, the OSS collected and analyzed information on areas of the world in which U.S. military forces were operating.

Before World War II, intelligence activities in the United States were mostly carried out by the Department of State, the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI), the War Department's Military Intelligence Division (MID). Hoping for greater coordination of intelligence activities, as well as a more strategic approach to intelligence gathering and operations; on July 11, 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt appointed Bill Donovan to head a new civilian office attached to the White House, as the Coordinator of Information (COI).

In achieving success, the OSS made plenty of domestic political and military enemies. US senators and congressmen with limited access to information about the OSS charged that it was riddled with Communists and criminals. They complained that for every OSS idea that worked there were 7 or 10 that didn’t, that the OSS had no organizational chart, that there was no accountability for the hundreds of millions of dollars it spent, and that Donovan ran it “like a country editor.” They concluded it was dangerous.

Roosevelt ignored the complaints as long as possible, and then had Colonel Richard Park, Jr., an officer from the White House map room, quietly look into the allegations. Roosevelt never got to read the report. He died on April 12, 1945. The next day, Park delivered the report to the new president, Harry Truman, a partisan Democrat who thought little of the Republican Donovan or any agency involved in subterfuge.

3 weeks after the Japanese surrender in mid-August 1945, Truman turned over the fate of the OSS to Congress. The Congressional Committee on Agency Liquidation then closed the OSS and with it one of the more intriguing and compelling chapters in American military history.

Overview
OSS in World War II
Pre-World War II
“Wild Bill” Donovan
More Fact Finding
Political Infighting
More Fact Finding
COI Functions
OSS Created
Headliners & “Joes”
Spy Schools
William Fairbairn
The Recruits
Recruiting the Brightest (2)
Creative Tools
Josephine Baker
Virginia Hall
Hall Remembered
“Joes” & “Jeds”
Diary Account of Narcisse (2)
Information Gathering
Congressional Enemies
Richard Park’s Report
End of the OSS
End of Presentation

This is one of many bundled power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading....World War II.
Total Pages
58 slides
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