Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan

Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Resource Types
Product Rating
Not yet rated
File Type
Compressed Zip File
Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.
How to unzip files.
3.78 MB   |   53 slides pages

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

This is a bundle of 3, highly animated, power point presentations on Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan. The three presentations together number 53 slides. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change it to fit your individual needs.

The era of feudalism in Japan took place from the 12th through 19th centuries. During that period local rulers, either powerful families or military warlords, dominated the land, while the emperor was merely a figurehead and not a significant political presence.

Japanese feudalism was organized around a four-tiered social structure: the samurai warrior class at the top, farmers & fisherman next, artisans, then merchants and shopkeepers at the bottom. The samurai warriors, also known as bushi, took as their creed what later became known as the "Way of the Warrior,” a rigid value system of discipline and honor that required them to live and die in the service of their lords.

Any form of disgrace, cowardice, dishonor, defeat, reflected poorly on the lord and was reason enough for a bushi to commit suicide by seppuku, or ritual disembowelment. In return for this devotion, the lord provided protection, financial security, and social status.

Power point presentation #1 is entitled, Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan contains 15 slides and covers the following:

Japanese Feudalism
Japanese Feudal Social Structure
The Samurai Warrior
The “Way of the Warrior”
Shogun Might
Kamakura Bakufu
Muromachi Bakufu
Oda Nobunaga
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Tokugawa Bakufu
Vocabulary (2)
End of Presentation

Between the 12th and 19th centuries, feudal Japan had an elaborate four tier class system. Unlike European feudal society, in which the peasants were at the bottom, the Japanese feudal class structure placed merchants on the lowest rung.

In 1868, the time of the "Floating World" came to an end, as a number of radical shocks completely remade Japanese society. The emperor retook power in his own right, in the Meiji Restoration, and abolished the office of the shogun. The samurai class was dissolved, and a modern military force created in its stead.

When Commodore Matthew Perry's U.S. Naval fleet steamed into Tokyo Bay in 1853 and demanded that Japan open its borders to foreign trade, it sounded the death-knell of the shogunate and of the 4 tier system.

Power point presentation #2 is entitled, Civilizations of East Asia - The Four Tiered Class System of Japan contains 18 slides and covers the following:

Introduction
Four Tiered Class System
The Samurai
Samurai & Daimyo
The Farmers
The Artisans
The Merchants
People Above the Four Tier System
The Emperor
People Below the Four Tier System
The Burakumin
Mercantilism
The Floating World
End of the
Four Tier System
End of Isolationism
End of Presentation

After 500 years of living in a unified Europe, the Roman Empire collapsed leaving the people to fend for themselves. Exposed to the elements and virtually starving, they worked hard simply to survive and needed protection. These challenges gave rise to the economic and political system historian called feudalism.

In this system, people pledged loyalty to a powerful landowner (lord) in return for protection. Armed warriors (knights) fought on behalf of the lords. Peasants worked the land and some peasants who could not leave the land were called serfs.

The era of feudalism in Japan took place from the 12th through 19th centuries. During that period local rulers, either powerful families or military warlords, dominated the land, while the emperor was merely a figurehead and not a significant political presence. Japanese feudalism was organized around a four-tiered social structure: the samurai warrior class at the top, farmers & fisherman next, artisans, then merchants and shopkeepers at the bottom.

This hierarchy was due to Confucian ideals, which emphasized the importance of individuals who produced things. Japanese feudalism is notably different from European feudalism, which placed agricultural workers at the bottom of the social strata.

Power point presentation #3 is entitled, Civilizations of East Asia - European v Japanese Feudalism contains 20 slides and covers the following:

European Feudalism
Japanese Feudalism
Comparison Map
Definition of Feudalism
Feudal Inclusions
Similarities
The Warriors
Fighting Equipment
Castles
Differences: Japan
Differences: Europe
Timing
Land Ownership
Other Differences
Facing Death
End of Presentation

This is one of many bundled power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading....Civilizations of East Asia.
Total Pages
53 slides
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A

Average Ratings

N/A
Overall Quality:
N/A
Accuracy:
N/A
Practicality:
N/A
Thoroughness:
N/A
Creativity:
N/A
Clarity:
N/A
Total:
0 ratings
COMMENTS AND RATINGS:
Please log in to post a question.
PRODUCT QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:
$9.99
Digital Download
ADD ONE TO CART
User Rating: 4.0/4.0
 (79 Followers)
$9.99
Digital Download
ADD ONE TO CART
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Bundle of 3 - Civilizations of East Asia - Feudal Japan
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign up