Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Groups & Political Parties

Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
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1.91 MB   |   102 slides pages


This is a bundle of 3, highly animated, power point presentations on Elections & Voting - Campaign Finance, Interest Groups and Political Parties. All three presentations together number 102 slides. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change it to fit your individual needs.

Running for office is expensive and the Rules are tightly monitored! Election Campaign funding comes primarily from four (4) sources.

1. Public Funding which allows taxpayers to contribute money from their tax refund to a Presidential Campaign fund which is then divided up between the candidates.
2. Through Political party contributions.
3. Political Action Committees (PACs), which are political fundraising organizations who want to help a candidate win.
4. Private funding. Less than 10% if contribution from individual donors.

This presentation provides an overview of how the campaign funding process works. It explains the ways individuals may support publicly funded Presidential candidates. It is provided to help students, understand the basics of public funding as pertains to national elections. It does not deal with how to apply for public funds.

Power point presentation #1, Voting & Elections - Campaign Finance contains 35 slides and covers the following:

Campaigning is Expensive
How Election Campaigns are Funded
Presentation Introduction
What is Public Funding?
How & When did it Begin
Federal Election Campaign Act
How Does
Public Funding Work?
Primary Matching Funds
Other Requirements
Becoming Eligible
General Election Funding
Minor Party Candidates
New Party Candidates
Spending Limitations
Convention Funding
Supplemental Services
What is the FEC’s Role?
Eligibility for Public Funds (2)
Repayment of Public Funds
How Can I Support My Candidate? (2)
Independent Expenditures (2)
Volunteer Services
Travel Expenses
Receptions & Parties
Contributions to Party Committees (2)
FEC Reports
Candidate Finances
End of Presentation

Politicians need votes to win election and re-election, but they also need lots of money so they go after it aggressively. An individual's vote carries with it an expectation that the candidate will look out for constituents' interests if elected. A campaign contribution may carry an expectation that the money will get repaid in the form of tax credits, favorable legislation, less stringent regulations, political appointments and/or government contracts.

The presentation covers the primary influencer's for political impact and elections and how each is set up to work. Each is named and summarized with emphasis on the PACS, Super PACS and Dark Money.

Power point presentation #2, Voting & Elections - Political Influencers and Interest Groups contains 35 slides and covers the following:

Interest Groups
Interest Groups Summary
Lobbyists Summary
“Revolving Door”
“Revolving Door” Summary
PACS Summary
History of PACS
How PACS Work
Leadership PACS
Non-Connected PACS
Super PACS
527 Groups
527 Groups Summary
Dark Money Groups
Dark Money Super PACS
Dark Money Growth
End of Presentation

The “Founding Fathers” did not intend for American politics to be partisan. The subject of political parties, has never been addressed in the United States Constitution. George Washington, the first president, was not a member of any political party at any time throughout his tenure as president.

In his 1796, “Farewell Address” to the nation, he warned against “the baneful effects of the spirit of party” as inciting American citizens “with ill-founded jealousies.” Both Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, in their federalist papers wrote specifically about the dangers of domestic political factions.

But they soon developed and have been a major part of the election process in the United States ever since.

Power point presentation #3, Voting & Elections - Development of Political Parties in the United States contains 45 slides and covers the following:

History of Political Parties
What Is A Political Party?
The Philadelphia Convention
Federalists v. Anti-Federalists
The First Political Party System (2)
The Second Political Party System (3)
Two Major Parties
The Third Political Party System (3)
The Fourth Political Party System (3)
The Fifth Political Party System (2)
The Sixth Political Party System (2)
Third Parties
Ideological Third Parties
The Odds Are Against Them
Minor Parties
Independent Voters
The Role of Political Parties
Running Candidates for Political Office
Checking the Other Party
Informing the Public
Organizing the Government
Why a Two Party System? (2)
Consensus of Values
Historical Influences
The “Winner-Take-All System”
American Politics Today
The Democrat Party
The Republican Party (2)
Final Thoughts

This is one of many bundled power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading....Voting & Elections
Total Pages
102 slides
Answer Key
Teaching Duration

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Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group
Bundle of 3 - Voting & Elections - Finance, Interest Group