Bundle of 3 - World War II - Patton, Rommel & Kasserine Pass

Bundle of 3 - World War II - Patton, Rommel & Kasserine Pass
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1.83 MB   |   49 slides pages

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This is a bundle of 3 highly animated, power point presentations on World War II - Patton, Rommel & The Kasserine Pass. The presentations together number 49 slides. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change them to fit your individual needs.

Swiftly advancing through the ranks to colonel in WW I, George Patton was given command of the 1st Provisional Tank Brigade in August 1918. Fighting as part of the 1st US Army, he was wounded in the leg at the Battle of St. Mihiel that September.

Recovering, he took part in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and Distinguished Service Medal, as well as a battlefield promotion to colonel. With the end of the war, he reverted to his peacetime rank of captain and was assigned to WDC.

Seeking to inspire his men, Patton developed a flashy image and routinely wore a highly polished helmet, cavalry pants and boots, and a pair of ivory-handled pistols. Traveling in a vehicle featuring oversize rank insignias and sirens, his speeches were frequently laced with profanity and espoused the utmost confidence in his men. While his behavior was popular with his troops, Patton was prone to indiscreet remarks which often stressed Eisenhower, which caused tension among the Allies.

With the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge on December 16, Patton began shifting his advance towards the threatened parts of the Allied line. In perhaps his greatest achievement of the conflict, he was able to quickly turn Third Army north and relieve the besieged 101st Airborne Division at Bastogne.

Power point #1 is entitled, The United States & WW II - Military Leaders - George Patton and contains 16 slides and covers the following:

Early Life & Career
Early Military Postings
World War I
Awards & Promotions
Peacetime Assignments
World War II
Management Style
North Africa & Sicily
Slapping Incident
Western Europe
Third Army Advances
Battle of the Bulge
Postwar & Death
End of Presentation

Erwin Rommel was one of German's most popular generals during World War II, and gained his enemies' respect with his victories as commander of the Afrika Korps. Called "the People's Marshal" by his countrymen, he was one of Adolf Hitler's most successful generals and one of Germany's most popular military leaders. He led the German army admirably but became embittered when his supplies were cut off forcing him to surrender most of his entire army.

Early in 1944, several of Rommel's friends approached him regarding a plot to depose Hitler. Agreeing to aid them in February, he wished to see Hitler brought to trial rather than assassinated. In the wake of the failed attempt to kill Hitler on July 20, Rommel's name was betrayed to the Gestapo. Due to Rommel's popularity, Hitler wished to avoid the scandal of revealing his involvement.

As a result, Rommel was given the option of committing suicide and his family receiving protection or going before the People's Court and his family persecuted. Electing for the former, he took a cyanide pill on October 14. Rommel's death was originally reported to the German people as a heart attack and he was given a full state funeral.

Power point #2 is entitled, World War II - German Military Leaders - Erwin Rommel and contains 18 slides and covers the following:

Introduction
Early Years & Marriage
World War I
Between The Wars
Noticed by Hitler
Service In France
“Ghost Division”
Afrika Korps
The Desert Fox
Failure & Retreat
Promoted to Field Marshall
Health Issues
Normandy Invasion
Plot Against Hitler
End of Presentation

The Battle of Kasserine Pass took place during the Tunisia Campaign of World War II. It was a series of battles fought around Kasserine Pass, a 2 mile wide gap in the Grand Dorsal chain of the Atlas Mountains in west central Tunisia.

The Axis forces involved, led by Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, were primarily from the Afrika Korps Assault Group, elements of the Italian Centauro Armored Division, 2 Panzer divisions detached from the 5th Panzer Army. The Allied forces involved came from the U.S Army's II Corps commanded by Major General Lloyd Fredendall, and the British 6th Armored Division commanded by Major-General Charles Keightley, which were part of the British 1st Army commanded by Lieutenant-General Kenneth Anderson.

While complete disaster had been averted, the Battle of Kasserine Pass was a humiliating defeat for US forces. Their first major clash with the Germans, the battle showed an enemy superiority in experience and equipment as well as exposed several flaws in the American command structure and doctrine.

After the fight, Rommel dismissed American troops as ineffective and felt they did not offer a threat to his command.

Power point #3 is entitled, World War II - African Campaign - Battle of Kasserine Pass and contains 15 slides and covers the following:

Overview
Combatants
Background
German Attack
Allies Driven Back
U. S. Retreat
Superior German Armor
Allies Hold
Rommel Withdraws
Aftermath
Change in Leadership
Change in Policy
End of Presentation

This is one of many bundled power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading....World War II.
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49 slides
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Bundle of 3 - World War II - Patton, Rommel & Kasserine Pass
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