Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges

Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
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4.82 MB   |   57 slides pages

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This is a bundle of 4, highly animated, power point presentations on the American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges. The 4 presentations together number 57 slides. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change it to fit your individual needs.

Andersonville, the most notorious prison of the Civil War, held more prisoners at any given time than any of the other Confederate military prisons. It was built in early 1864 after Confederate officials decided to move the large number of Federal prisoners in and around Richmond to a place of greater security and more abundant food. During the 14 months it existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here. Of these, almost 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements.

Power point presentation #1, American Civil War - Prisons - Andersonville contains 17 slides and covers the following:

Background
Facility Description
The “Deadline”
Water Supply
Earthen Forts
Prison Population
Inadequate Care
Living Conditions
Prisoners Moved
Captain Henry Wirz
Wirz’s Execution
Andersonville Closed
Identifying the Dead
Unknown Soldiers
End of Presentation

Elmira Prison was a prisoner-of-war camp constructed by the Union Army in Elmira, NY, during the American Civil War to house captive Confederate soldiers. The site was selected partially due to its proximity to the Erie Railway and the Northern Central Railway, which criss-crossed in the midst of the city, making it a prime location for a Union Army training and muster point early in the Civil War. Most of the 30-acre Union installation, known as Camp Rathbun, fell into disuse as the war progressed, but the camp's "Barracks #3" were converted into a military prison in the summer of 1864.

Power point presentation #2, American Civil War - Prisons - Elmira contains 12 slides and covers the following:

Background
Location
Prison Population
Facility Description
Prisoners Health
Wintertime
Prisoner Inventory
Escapees
Elmira Closed
End of Presentation

At the start of the Civil War, a formal exchange system for prisoners of war was not arranged because President Lincoln did not recognize the Confederacy as having wartime rights. After the defeat of Union forces at the Battle of First Bull Run, with a large number of Union prisoners held by the Confederacy, the U.S. Congress requested that Lincoln take measures to effect an exchange.

The system was bogged down by paperwork, but the agreement operated reasonably well. By the summer of 1863 the federal government had begun to use black soldiers in its war effort.The Confederacy refused to recognize black soldiers as prisoners of war, but reduced them to slave status and threatened to execute as insurrectionist and the Union officers who had commanded them.

Power point presentation #3, American Civil War - Prisons - Prisoner Exchanges contains 18 slides and covers the following:

Overview
Exchange Agreement
The Equivalency Table
System Breakdown
Grant Refused to Exchange
Emancipation Proclamation
Conditional Exchanges
Grant’s Reasoning
Lee’s Proposal
POW Conditions Worsen
Southern Blame Game
Suffering Increases
Citizen Outcry
Lincoln’s Refusal
Exchanges Restored
End of Presentation

Lacking means for dealing with large numbers of captured troops in the early years of the war, the U.S. and Confederate governments both relied on the traditional European system for the parole and exchange of prisoners. It worked this way: Any prisoner not exchanged within 10 days of being captured was to be released upon signing a pledge not to take up arms against his captors until he had been formally exchanged for an enemy prisoner.

Power point presentation #4, American Civil War - Prisons - The Paroles System contains 10 slides and covers the following:

Parole System
Parole System In Place
Parole System Breakdown
Formal Agreement
Working The System
Parole at Vicksburg
Parole at Appomattox
End of Presentation

This is one of many bundled power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading....American Civil War.
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57 slides
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Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
Bundle of 4 - American Civil War - Prisons & Exchanges
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