Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa

Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
Bundle of 5 - Kingdoms of Medieval Africa
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5 Products in this Bundle
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  1. This is a 18 slide, highly animated, power point presentation on the Kingdoms of Medieval Africa: The Kingdom of Ghana. All the slides are editable so you can adjust your presentation as you see fit. The Kingdom of Ghana existed around 500 to 1200s CE. Today the region makes up the countries of M
  2. This is a 14 slide, highly animated, power point presentation on the Kingdoms of Medieval Africa: The Mali Empire. All the slides are editable so you can adjust your presentation as you see fit. Mali began as a small Malinke kingdom around the upper areas of the Niger River. It became an importa
  3. This is a 21 slide, highly animated, power point presentation on the Kingdoms of Medieval Africa: The Songhai Empire. All the slides are editable so you can adjust your presentation as you see fit. The Songhai Empire, also known as the Songhay Empire, was a state located in western Africa. From t
  4. This is a 38 slide, highly animated power point presentation on Kingdoms of Medieval Africa – The Kingdom of Kush. Each of the slides are editable, so you can modify those to meet your individual needs. Kush was a kingdom in northern Africa in the region corresponding to modern-day Sudan. Kush (la
  5. This is a 21 slide, highly animated power point presentation on Kingdoms of Medieval Africa – The Kingdom of Askum. Each of the slides are editable, so you can modify those to meet your individual needs. The Kingdom of Aksum (later Ethiopia) was an ancient African trading empire centered in Eritre
Bundle Description
This is a bundle of 5 power point presentations on Kingdoms of Medieval Africa. It includes presentations on the empires of Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Kush and Askum. The total number of slides is 112 and each one is editable, so you can modify those to meet your individual needs.

Power point presentation #1 is titled, Kingdoms of Medieval Africa - Ghana a West Africa Trading Empire and contains 18 slides.

The Kingdom of Ghana existed around 500 to 1200s CE. Today the region makes up the countries of Mali and Mauritania, not the present country of Ghana. It is unknown how the Kingdom of Ghana started. It was already flourishing by 900CE when Arab scholars began recording information from early traders. By 1000 BCE, the nation had undergone expansion and take control of large portions of land near the Niger and Senegal Rivers.

The region was rich in gold and its acquisition meant that Ghana would become a leading force in the trans-Sahara trade network. Eventually, in the mid 11th century, the Almoravids, a Muslim group launched a devastating invasion on the capitol city of Kombi. Ghana recovered and forced the invaders to withdraw.

A little less than 200 years later, Ghana had become weakened by a scarcity of natural resources like water and trees. In 1240 CE, Ghana was invaded by the Mande people and emerged as their own new powerful empire Mali. It became an even stronger trading empire, backed by a strong Muslim religion.

Background
Ghana’s Trade Routes
Ghana’s Wealth
Absolute Rule
Citizen Justice
Conquered Subjects
Ghana Military
Trade
The Camel
Spread of Islam
The Gold-Salt Trade
Ghana Taxes
Kumbi Trading Market
Wangara Trading Market
The Decline of Ghana
End of Presentation

Power point presentation #2 is titled, Kingdoms of Medieval Africa - The Kingdom of Mali and contains 14 slides.

Mali began as a small Malinke kingdom around the upper areas of the Niger River. It became an important empire after 1235 when Sundjata organized Malinke resistance against a branch of the southern Soninke, who made up the center of the older kingdom of Ghana.

The empire developed around its capital of Niani, the city of Sundjata's birth near the gold fields of Bure. Unlike the people of the older kingdom of Ghana, who had only camels, horses, and donkeys for transport, the people of Mali also used the river Niger. By river, they could transport bulk goods and larger loads much more easily than by land. Living on the fertile lands near the Niger, people suffered less from drought than those living in the drier regions further north.

The Niger River enabled the Kingdom of Mali to develop a far more stable economy than Ghana had enjoyed and contributed to the rise of the Mali Empire.

Map of the Kingdom of Mali
Background
Niger River
Vast Empire Created
Mali Empire Prospers
Taxes & Currency
Mansa Musa
Mansu Musa’s Hajj
Mali’s Highpoint
Collapse of the Kingdom
End of Presentation

Power point presentation #3 is titled, Kingdoms of Medieval Africa - The Songhai Empire and contains 21 slides.

The Songhai Empire, also known as the Songhay Empire, was a state located in western Africa. From the early 15th to the late 16th century, Songhai was one of the largest Islamic empires in history. This empire bore the same name as its leading ethnic group, the Songhai. Its capital was the city of Gao, where a Songhai state had existed since the 11th century.

Its base of power was on the bend of the Niger River in present day Niger and Burkina Faso. In 1340, the Songhai took advantage of the Mali Empire's decline and successfully asserted its independence. Disputes over succession weakened the Mali Empire, and many of its peripheral subjects broke away. The Songhai made Gao their capital and began an imperial expansion of their own throughout the western Sahel.

By 1420, Songhai was strong enough to exact tribute from Masina. In all, the Sonni Dynasty would count 18 kings.

Map of the Songhai Empire
Overview
Background
Imperial Songhai
Sunni Ali
Resistance
Sunni Ali’s Legacy
Askia Muhammad
the Great
Devout Muslim
Muslim Culture Embraced
Administration
Economy
The Quadi
Government (2)
Revolt
Fall of the Empire
Songhai Empire’s High Point
End of Presentation

Power point presentation #4 is titled, Kingdoms of Medieval Africa - The Kingdom of Kush and contains 38 slides.

Kush was a kingdom in northern Africa in the region corresponding to modern-day Sudan. Kush (later referred to as Nubia) was inhabited 8,000 BCE but the Kingdom of Kush rose much later. Egyptians were in contact with the Kushites from the Early Dynastic Period in Egypt (3150 - 2613 BCE), onwards and evolved from this earlier culture and was heavily influenced by the Egyptians. The Kingdom of Kush flourished between 1069 BCE and 350 BCE, a period of roughly 1400 years.

The Kingdom of Kush mirrored Ancient Egypt in government, culture, and religion. The Kushites built pyramids at burial sites, worshiped Egyptian gods, and mummified the dead. Most of the people of Kush were farmers, whose primary crops were wheat, barley and cotton. The ruling class of Kush likely considered themselves Egyptian in many ways.

Two of the most important resources of Ancient Kush were gold and iron. Gold helped Kush to become wealthy as it could be traded to the Egyptians and other nearby nations. Iron was the most important metal of the age. It was used to make the strongest tools and weapons. Besides gold and iron, other important trade items included ivory, slaves, incense, feathers, and wild animal hides.

The region was known by the Egyptians as “The Land of the Bow”, in reference to skilled Kushite archers, by the time of the Old Kingdom of Egypt. Famous for its archers and the bow and arrow, they were often depicted in the art of Ancient Kush. The Egyptians also knew the land as “Land of the Black People”. Greek and Roman writers referred to the region as “Land of the Burnt-Faced Persons” in reference to the indigenous peoples’ black skin, and the Arab tribes knew it as Bilad al-Sudan Land of the Blacks”.

Kushite kings became the pharaohs of Egypt’s 25th Dynasty. The Kushite king Kashta, 750 BCE, was the first to establish himself on the Egyptian throne. He was followed by other great Kushite kings who reigned until the Assyrian invasion of Egypt by Ashurbanipal in 666 BCE.

The kingdom grew until it was powerful enough to take what it wanted from Egypt whenever it wanted, but they did not enter Egypt as conquerors but as ruler’s intent on preserving Egyptian culture. Piye, 747-721 BCE, became one of the most famous leaders of Kush. He allowed the conquered kings to retain their thrones, re-establish their authority, and continue as they had previously; they simply had to acknowledge him as their lord.

In 330 CE the Axumites invaded and sacked the kingdom. When the last of the people walked away from the city 350 CE, the Kingdom of Kush had come to an end.

Background (2)
Identity with Egypt
Trade
Hierarchy of the Kushites
Rise & Fall of Kush
Pharaohs of Egypt
Decline of Napata
“The Land of the Bow”
Source for Gold
“Land of the Black People”
The City of Kerma
The “Deffufa”
Kerma Culture
End of the Kerma Period
The City of Napata
Temple of Amun
Decline of the New Kingdom
Kushite Power Increases
King Kashta
The 25th Dynasty
“God’s Wife”
Piye
Preserving Egyptian Culture
The Assyrians
Conquered & Deported
End of the 25th Dynasty
The City of Meroe
Arkamani I
Egyptian Culture Discarded
Female Monarchs
Meroe’s Wealth (2)
End of the Kingdom of Kush
End of Presentation

Power point presentation #5 is titled, Kingdoms of Medieval Africa - The Kingdom of Askum (Axum) and contains 21 slides.

The Kingdom of Aksum (later Ethiopia) was an ancient African trading empire centered in Eritrea and northern Ethiopia. It existed from approximately 100 AD–940 AD, growing to achieve prominence by the 1st century AD. The Empire of Aksum at its height extended across most of present day Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Djibouti, Sudan Egypt, Yemen and Saudi Arabia. "Ethiopia" as early as the 4th century.

Askum, the capitol city, developed as a local power. At its height during the 3rd–6th century CE, Aksum became the greatest market of northeastern Africa; its merchants traded as far as Alexandria and beyond the Nile River. During the 4th century the kings of Aksum were Christians —thus becoming both politically and religiously linked to Byzantine Egypt. As a civilization it had a profound impact upon the people of Egypt, southern Arabia, Europe and Asia. The Aksumites developed Africa’s only indigenous written script, Ge’ez.

The Kingdom of Askum was one of the 4 greatest powers in the world at the time. Despite its power and reputation, but very little is known about Aksum. Its civilization was considered as advanced as the Western European societies of the time. By late 3rd century, Aksum had begun minting its own currency and was named as one of the 4 great powers of this time along with Persia, Rome and China.

The Kingdom of Askum served as a link between the trading systems of the Mediterranean and the Asiatic world and shows the extent of international commerce at that time. It holds the fascination of being a "lost" civilization, yet one that was African, Christian, with its own script and coinage, and with an international reputation.

The Aksumite Kingdom adopted Christianity as its state religion in 325 or 328 AD under King Ezana and was the first state ever to use the image of the cross on its coins. Although Christianity had a profound effect upon Aksum, Judaism also had a substantial impact on the kingdom and their religion shares a common ancestry with modern Judaism.

The empire began to decline in the early 7th century. War, over-expenditure in money and manpower, climate change and the influence of Islam, pushed Aksum into economic isolation, nonetheless Aksum remained Christian.

It has also been claimed that Aksum is the home of the Biblical Ark of the Covenant, in which lies the "Tablets of Law" upon which the Ten Commandments are inscribed. Menelik, the son of Solomon and Sheba, is believed to have taken the Ark of the Covenant on a visit to Jerusalem to see his father. It is supposed to reside still in the Church of St Mary in Aksum, though no-one is allowed to set eyes on it.

The Kingdom of Askum (Ethiopia)
Askum’s Growth
Askum: 6th-9th Century
Impact of Askum’s Kingdom
One of Four Great Powers
A “Lost” Civilization
Askum Society
Daily Life
Christianity Established
Christianity Maintained
Beginning of the End?
Rise of Islam
Decline of the Kingdom
Female Usurper
Change & Isolation
Judaism
King Solomon & Queen Sheba
Keepers of the Ark
End of Presentation

This is one of many power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading....Kingdoms of Medieval Africa.
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