CIVIL WAR PERIOD-THE WILD WEST (Lessons 51-60/100) American History Curriculum

CIVIL WAR PERIOD-THE WILD WEST (Lessons 51-60/100) American History Curriculum
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Supplement the textbook and eliminate prep time with these 10 ready-to-use reproducible American history lessons covering U.S. history from the Civil War Period to the Wild West era.

Your 5th or 6th graders will enjoy a wide variety of high-interest activities for individuals, small groups, or the entire class. Among other fun things to do, students will pretend to be an abolitionist and write an article about slavery for The Liberator newspaper using information from a chart describing living conditions for slaves

Most lessons have four or five activity sheets and can be finished in one or two class periods. Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key provided for each lesson. A majority of the lessons include a 20-question follow-up quiz. The quizzes can also be given as homework assignments or review exercises. Most of the information-filled lessons are able to be used without a textbook.

LESSON/ACTIVITY TITLES (51-60 of 100)
51. Slavery and the Abolitionists
52. Major Battles of the Civil War
53. Reading: Andersonville Prison
54. To Tell the Truth: Abraham Lincoln
55. President Study Guide
56. The Last Frontier
57. To Tell the Truth: Chief Joseph
58. Miners, Cowboys, and Farmers
59. The Wild West
60. New States Join the Union

Detailed descriptions of these lessons are provided below.


LESSON 51. Slavery and the Abolitionists

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the role played by antislavery groups during a period of increasing tensions between the North and South.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson has a nice variety of things to do.

Begin by reading with the class the introductory paragraphs about slavery in America. Students then construct a bar graph showing the growth of slaves between 1790 and 1860.

Assign the section entitled The Abolitionist Movement where students will read a story and fill in missing words, names, and terms.

Next, class members will do a section entitled An Abolitionist Describes Slavery, which includes a primary source reading selection. Students are asked to write a paragraph giving their reaction to Theodore Weld’s description of the treatment of slaves in the United States. This helps develop critical thinking skills, and you can ask several students to read their paragraphs to the class.

To conclude this lesson, students will pretend to be an abolitionist and write an article about slavery for The Liberator using information from a chart describing living conditions for slaves. I have my kids do this assignment for the next class period, and have a few of them read their articles to the class.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 52. Major Battles of the Civil War

OBJECTIVE:
To review key battles and other significant events of the Civil War.

TIME:
2 class periods

My students really like this information-filled map exercise, and I provide them with colored pencils to make it even more enjoyable.

Begin the lesson by giving each class member a copy of pages 52A - 52F. Have them tape pages 52E and 52F together to form a 2-page map showing the sites of major Civil War battles.

Have students read the section entitled Confederate Attack on Fort Sumter, then have them do steps 1-3 on the map.

Continue in the same way with all other sections:

• Battle of Bull Run
• The War in the East (1862-1863)
• The War in the West (1862-1863)
• Last Years of the War (1864-1865).

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 53. Reading: Andersonville Prison

OBJECTIVE:
To examine conditions at the most notorious of Civil War prisons.

TIME:
1 class period

In this lesson, students read a story about the Andersonville Prison. Afterwards, the stories are collected by the teacher from each class member.

Students are then given a different version of the story about Andersonville Prison. This version is different in that many key words, names, and terms are missing. Each class member will try to fill in the spaces with the missing words, names, and terms that correctly complete the sentences. The first and last letters of each answer are given in the blank spaces as clues.

ACTIVITY OPTIONS:
This lesson can be turned into a fun contest between individual class members, or pairs, to see who can come up with the most correct answers by the end of the period. You can also turn this into a game by dividing the class into two teams that will take turns trying to identify the correct answers as you read through the story with them.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 54. To Tell the Truth: Abraham Lincoln

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with the life of George Washington and the role which he played in shaping the early history of the United States.

TIME:
1 class period

This activity begins by giving each student a copy of pages 54A - 54E. Then, choose three students to be Abraham Lincoln. Tell the three which one is the real Lincoln (the answer is in the Teacher Instructions), but do not inform the other class members.

Pick twelve students to be panelists. They will each ask an assigned question. At the end of the game, these panelists and the other class members will vote for the person they think is the real Abraham Lincoln. After the voting has taken place, ask the students to give reasons for their choices. The real Lincoln will then be asked to step forward. It is NUMBER 2.

When the voting is taking place, ask the students to give reasons for their choice.

Once the TO TELL THE TRUTH game is finished, students will answer 10 true/false questions based on information they learned during game.

MY EXPERIENCE USING THIS LESSON
At the beginning of the period, when I ask for the three class members to volunteer to be Abraham Lincoln, almost every hand goes up. That happens because TO TELL THE TRUTH games are very popular.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 55. President Study Guide

OBJECTIVE:
To study the life and times of one of the Presidents of the United States.

TIME:
Will vary depending on whether the students are given class time to work on the report.

Students will use this study guide to do research on the life and times of one of the Presidents of the United States. The guide has them find and record information in a variety of ways about the President's early life, middle years, political and professional background, election campaign, years in office, and names of Vice President(s) and Cabinet officials,

Decide whether this assignment will be done in or outside of class. Be sure the students have access to needed reference materials, especially encyclopedias. If the report is being done in class, two or three sets of encyclopedias will be needed in the room, unless online access is available to a reliable source. Some volumes in each set have more than one President, while others have none. I recommend the World Book encyclopedia.

I have each student submit a list of 5 Presidents in the order in which they prefer working on them. Then, I assign one President to each student based on their list of preferences, and on the encyclopedia volumes still available.

After the reports have been completed, you may want to have a few volunteers read part 8 to the class, which involves them writing 100-150 words about the administration of the President they selected.

NOTE: The PRESIDENT STUDY GUIDE can also be used by students who want to do an extra credit assignment.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions are included.


LESSON 56. The Last Frontier

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with the people and events involved in the settlement of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain region.

TIME:
30 minutes

Students will learn about the "last frontier" while reading through a series of 50 sentences and filling in missing words, names, and terms. An answer list is provided.

ACTIVITY OPTIONS:
This lesson can be turned into a fun contest between individual class members, or pairs, to see who can come up with the most correct answers by the end of the period. It can also be presented as a game by dividing the class into two teams that take turns trying to identify the correct answers as you read through the sentences with them.

Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 57. To Tell the Truth: Chief Joseph

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with the life of Chief Joseph and the role he played in the conflict between the Indians and white man.

TIME:
1 class period

Give each student a copy of pages 57A - 57D.

Choose three students to be Chief Joseph. Tell the three which one is the real Chief Joseph, but do not inform the other class members.

Choose ten students to be panelists. They will each ask an assigned question. At the end of the game, these panelists and the other class members will vote for the person they think is the real Chief Joseph. At this point, the real one will be asked to step forward.

When the voting is taking place, ask the students to give reasons for their choice.

Once the TO TELL THE TRUTH game is finished, students will answer 12 true/false questions based on information they learned during game.

MY EXPERIENCE USING THIS LESSON
At the beginning of the period, when I ask for the three class members to volunteer to be Chief Joseph, almost every hand goes up. That happens because TO TELL THE TRUTH games are very popular.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 58. Miners, Cowboys, and Farmers

OBJECTIVE:
To review the roles played by miners, cowboys, and farmers in the development of the West.

TIME:
1 class period

The lesson begins with a section entitled People of the West. Students work individually to correctly identify whether miners (M), cowboys (C), or farmers (F) are being described throughout a series of 25 descriptions.

Example:
(1) _____ received 160 acres of land as a result of the Homestead Act
Answer: F

Next, in a section entitled Grasshoppers Overrun a Kansas Farm, students read a primary source account describing the challenges homesteaders faced in the Great Plains.

The lesson concludes with two fun games for the class, THE MINING GAME and THE GAMBLER'S GAME. My students have found these two games to be very exciting!

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 59. The Wild West

OBJECTIVE:
To examine ways of living on the last frontier during the 1860s, 1870s, and 1880s.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson begins by giving each student a copy of pages 59A - 59C only. Page 59D will be distributed later in the period.

Read the introductory paragraphs about the "Wild West," as well as A Tall Tale, with the class. Then, give students a few minutes to write down two reasons in the spaces provided on page 59B why they would not have believed certain parts of the tale. Discuss their answers.

Next, read with the class the section Life in the West, then go over the rules for THE GUNSLINGERS GAME. Use the questions on page 59D during the game.

THE GUNSLINGERS GAME will be played by class members who want to face off against each other in a series of “gunfights.” One “gunslinger” will be matched against another to see who is first to answer a question about our Western states. The first person to answer correctly wins the duel. The other person is “dead,” and is eliminated from the game. The winners in the first round will then be matched against each other in a second round of gunfights. There will be more rounds until only one gunslinger remains “alive.” The winner will be “the fastest gun in the West.”

My students really enjoy this!

When the game ends, give each student a copy of page 59D to do as a review sheet.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 60. New States Join the Union

OBJECTIVE:
To summarize the events which led to the admission of fourteen new states in the years after the Civil War.

TIME:
2 class periods

This lesson begins by giving each student a copy of pages 60A - 60D only. Pages 60E and 60F will be distributed at the start of the second class period.

Fourteen states in the West joined the Union between 1867 and 1959. Students will read about early events in each of these states and unscramble key words, names, and terms which complete the sentences.

Nebraska (1867)
Colorado (1876)
North Dakota and South Dakota (1889)
Montana (1889)
Washington (1889)
Idaho (1890)
Wyoming (1890)
Utah (1896)
Oklahoma (1907)
New Mexico (1912)
Arizona (1912)
Alaska (1959)
Hawaii (1959)

Next, class members will do a fun Map Exercise that requires them to label all fifty states and include the year when each joined the Union. NOTE: Students will need a map of the United States in their textbook or in an atlas that identifies individual states.

To conclude the lesson, students enjoy playing THE GAME OF THE STATES. The class will be divided into groups which will compete against each other in a contest involving speed and accuracy. Each group has 30 minutes to answer as many questions as possible by filling in the space in each sentence with the state being described.

Group members can use textbooks, encyclopedias, and any other available reference materials.

All group members must fill in the spaces with their team’s answers during the game.

At the end of 30 minutes, each team will submit one copy of their answers to the teacher. Names of group members should be listed at the top.

Questions are divided into three levels of difficulty, and are worth 1, 2, or 3 points each. A perfect score is 100. The team scoring the most points in the allotted time wins THE GAME OF THE STATES.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.
Total Pages
58 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
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