Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop

Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
Calculating Percent Increase and Decrease | 7th Math Workshop
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PDF

(24 MB|8 Activities; 72 pages)
Product Rating
4.0
(3 Ratings)
Standards
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  2. Are you looking for Math Workshop Activities to use in your classroom that will not only allow you to make the best use of you planning time but also allow you to easily implement Math Workshop because the planning is already done for you?**Want to know more? Check out the video here to learn more a
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  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Are you looking for Math Workshop Activities to use in your classroom for Calculating Percent Increase and Percent Decrease that will not only allow you to make the best use of your planning time but also allow you to easily implement Math Workshop because the planning is already done for you?

**Want to know more? Check out the video here to learn more about the Math Workshop Concept-Based Activities!**

Within this Weekly Unit, you will find 8 activities provided to you for you to pick and choose, or even allow a choice among your students to determine which activities they want to work on each week.

These low-prep activities will also allow you to spend less time prepping each week and more time spending time with your students in Guided Math, having math conference or assessing students.

After many years of using Math Workshop, I dreamt about having a year-long product that was done for me and I could simply pull the activities as needed and this was the culmination of this idea. Each of the activities within is UNIQUE to this Math Workshop bundle and not found sold individually anywhere else.

Included in This Download for Week Eight Calculating Percent Increase and Percent Decrease:

  • Cover for Teacher Book (can be printed and slipped in a binder or used as a cover in a bound book)
  • Labels for Each Activity (with TEKS, CCSS, OAS and no standards included)
  • Teacher Instructions for Each Activity with Information for Preparing each Activity as well as Materials Needed
  • EIGHT Activities for Calculating Percent Increase and Percent Decrease
  • Each Activity Includes Student Directions cards and Printable Components for each activity

Interested in the Math Workshop FREE Sampler including EIGHT trial activities? Grab the Sampler and check it out today!

Activities INCLUDED in the Week Eight Activity Bundle ARE:

  • Percent Increase and Decrease Solve and Match
  • Percent Increase and Decrease Which One Doesn't Belong?
  • Amount of Increase and Decrease Start to Finish Puzzle
  • Percent Increase and Decrease Task Cards
  • Percent Increase and Decrease Sort
  • Percent Increase and Decrease Memory
  • Percent Increase and Decrease War
  • Percent Increase and Decrease Solve & Color

Interested in Upgrading and buying the FULL YEAR of Seventh Grade Math Workshop at once? Check out this bundle with all of the details!

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→ Did you know that you can get CREDITS for future purchase by leaving feedback on each of your purchases? Simply navigate to the My Purchases page and next to each download you will be able to leave a star rating and comments about the activities you have purchased. I truly value your feedback and consider each and every word left.

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Personal Copyright: The purchase of this product allows you to use these activities in your personal classroom for your students. You may continue to use them each year but you may not share the activities with other teachers unless additional licenses are purchased. The license for this purchase is NON-TRANSFERABLE. Site and District Licenses are also available.

4mulaFun®, Flippables™ and Solve and Snip™ are trademarks of Smith Curriculum and Consulting (formerly FormulaFun Inc. dba 4mulaFun), and are registered in the United States and abroad. The trademarks and names of other companies and products mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners. Copyright © Smith Curriculum and Consulting, Inc. All rights reserved.

DISCLAIMER: With the purchase of this file you understand that this file is not editable in any way. You will not be able to manipulate the lessons and/or activities inside to change numbers and/or words.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Total Pages
8 Activities; 72 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 Week
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