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Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters

Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Capitalization and Punctuation 20 Worksheets/Posters
Product Description
27 Worksheets in 2 differentiated formats covering Capitalization and Punctuation including posters, bookmarks, reviews and answer sheets for each rule.


Capitalization
Rule: The first word of a sentence begins with a capital letter
Rule: The word I is always capitalized.
Rule: The first letter of days of the week, months of the year, and holidays are capitalized.
Rule: Proper nouns (names of people, specific places, and specific things) should be capitalized.
Rule: The first word, last word, and other important words are capitalized in a title.
Rule: A title before a name is capitalized.
Rule: Initials and titles of people are capitalized.
Rule: The first word in a direct quotation should be capitalized.


Punctuation
Rule: A period is used at the end of a declarative and imperative sentence.
Rule: A question asks something and ends with a question mark. (?)
Rule: An exclamation point shows feeling and ends with an exclamation point. (!)
Rule: Words in a series are separated by commas.
Rule: A comma is used before a conjunction that joins two sentences.
Rule: A comma is placed after an introductory word such as yes, no, and however.
Rule: A comma is used to separate the name of a person who is being spoken to directly.
Rule: A comma is used to separate the parts of a date.
Rule: A comma is used to separate the name of a city from a state and a state from a country.
Rule: Quotation marks (“ “) are used before and after the exact words of a speaker.
Rule: An apostrophe is used to show ownership or possession. To show possession of a single object add (‘s), unless the word ends in s then just add the apostrophe. To show possession of plural objects just add an apostrophe.
Rule: A contraction is the shortened form of a word or words joined together by replacing one or more letters with an apostrophe (‘)


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
Total Pages
135 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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