Chop it Up: A Look at Food Justice Unit

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  • Google Drive™ folder
$15.00
$15.00
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Description

Unit Essential Questions:

1. How can food be used as a tool for both oppression and liberation?

2. How does our neighborhood influence the choices we make about our health?

3. What is the relationship between privilege, poverty,  and consumption?

4. How can we, as students, become involved in the food justice movement?

5. How does the history of systemic racism in America create food insecurity?

6. How do issues of land access impact food access both historically and presently?

What's included?

  • A hyperdoc with 11 readings. All readings include text-dependent questions.
  • A hyperdoc with 3 videos with questions
  • 6 projects
  • Text Annotation Guide
  • Analysis of Ted Talks
Total Pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
2 months
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

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