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Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet

Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet
Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet
Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet
Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet
Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet
Compare Planet and Moon Size on the iPad! Free app and response sheet
Product Description
To use this worksheet you will need to download the FREE app Interactive Minds Solar System Lite to a teacher iPad or student iPads.

This activity asks students to use an interactive feature of this free app to compare the size of several planets and their moons to each other. Students should work with their iPad and record their answers on the included worksheet.

Examples of questions asked: *these questions make a lot more sense with the visual elements present in each question.

Open the app and swipe ahead to the 8th slide. This tool allows you to compare the size of different planets, dwarf planets, and moons in our solar system. Use this slide to answer the following questions.

Place the sun in box #1. Then place Earth in box #2. Draw and label Earth. Replace Earth with Jupiter. Draw and label Jupiter in box #2.

Place Earth in the box on the left. Then place our moon in the box on the right. How many moons can fit across Earth? Make copies of the moon across the equator to find out.

Jupiter has more than 60 moons! The four most well-known moons are its largest. They are called the Galilean Moons, after the famous astronomer that discovered them. How would you describe the size of Jupiter’s moons compared to Earth’s moon?

This number is called a ratio. The closer the numbers are to each other, the closer the planets are in size. For example, this ratio is 1.00 to 1.00 because it’s comparing Earth to Earth. What is the ratio when comparing Mercury to Jupiter?

Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet because it hasn’t cleared its orbit of asteroids and other space debris. Its small size and long orbit are two reasons it hasn’t been able to do this. How would you compare the size of Pluto to our smallest planet, Mercury?

Order the planets from smallest to largest. Use the app to check your work.

The app has a lot of cool slides, each one could be made into its own lesson / activity. Check it out, even if you don't purchase this item. It is great.
Total Pages
2 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
40 minutes
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