Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life

Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
Comparing the Film and the Novel: Applying critical thinking to everyday life
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209 KB|12 pages (but 5 pages of explanation of philosophy and teaching format)
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Students engage in informal comparative analysis of pop culture all the time. This exercise will provide them with a quick template that they can use to engage in compelling arguments among their friends, while at the same time providing practice in critical thinking that can be applied to argumentative essays in college, and later in their jobs -- from sales and marketing, to law and politics. Often, in English classes, we have students read a novel, and then watch the movie. Many students will initially say they prefer the movie because they find it easier to “read” a movie, they prefer seeing the images and characters to taking the time to create them in their heads through the text. But there will be some who prefer the book for the opposite reasons and the discussion that comes from this valuable. In the end, many will agree that the two enrich each other, creating a third experience that stays with them longer than had they only experience the one version of the story.

* Students will create an informed opinion.
* Students will structure their opinion in a format that allows for opposition.
* Students will apply their knowledge of the literary elements of theme, character, imagery, and diction to clarify their opinions.

This lesson contains the following:
1 . A detailed, step by step description of what students do.
2. A template and sample for writing an opinion based upon literary evidence.
3. Ideas for grading and assisting.
4. A reflection activity.
5. Follow up assignment ideas.

Time: film time 2- 2.5 hours. Discussion and writing 90 minutes
Watching the film: add about 30-40 minutes to the length of the film to allow for stopping every 5-10 minutes to discuss comparisons and cinematic vs literary devices.
After film, individual opinion 10 minutes for film, then 10 minutes for book
After individual notes, group discussion 10 minutes
Class discussion 15 minutes
Introduce template 5 minutes
Write evaluation 20-30 minutes
Peer edit 10-15 minutes
Total Pages
12 pages (but 5 pages of explanation of philosophy and teaching format)
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
4 days
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