Conflict and Cans: "Periodic Table and Trends" Unit (PBL) with Distance Learning

Grade Levels
10th - 12th
Standards
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Pages
94 pages
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Description

Conflict and Cans: A Problem-Based "Periodic Table and Trends" Unit (PBL) for High School Chemistry

Summary:

Your company, Can-Do Enterprises, is a manufacturer of tin cans, steel cans with a tin-plating. Recently, one of your tin suppliers has been accused of trading in conflict resources. To avoid bad press (and bad karma), Can-Do is looking into the feasibility of changing its plating from tin to another elemental material.

See the preview for the complete introduction, a list of materials, and the first day activities.

Both the classroom version and the distance learning version follow the outline below. In the distance learning option, the case is presented using readings, virtual simulations, and videos.

This product is also part of a BUNDLE found here.

Previous knowledge: physical and chemical properties, parts of an atom, states of matter

Objectives:

General:

- Explain the use of chemical and physical properties in the historical development of the Periodic Table;

- Use the periodic table to identify and explain the properties of chemical families, including alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, noble gases, and transition metals.

- Use the Periodic Table to identify and explain periodic trends, including atomic and ionic radii, electronegativity, and ionization energy.

- Express the arrangement of electrons in atoms through electron configurations and Lewis valence electron dot structures.

NGSS:

HS-PS1-1. Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.

HS-PS2-6. Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.

HS-PS1-2. Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.

HS-ETS1-1. Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.

HS-ETS1-2. Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

HS-ETS1-3. Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.

Contents:

Day 1:

Introduction

Getting to Know the Can/ Thinking About Cans - Background

Getting to Know the Periodic Table – Periodic table basics

Day 2:

Element Joke Activity – Practice with periodic table basics

Reviewing the Atom – Notes on valence electrons and Lewis dot diagrams

Practicing with Valence and Lewis Dot WS

Day 3:

Finish Reviewing the Atom – Notes on oxidation numbers

Reviewing the Atom Bingo Activity – Practice with the periodic table

Adding to the Periodic Table WS – Readings about types of elements

Day 4:

Electron Configuration Notes – Notes on orbital diagrams and writing electron configurations

Day 5:

Electron Configuration Notes Continued - Notes on using the periodic table to write electron configurations

Electron Configuration Battleship Activity – Practice with writing electron configurations

Day 6:

Metals, Non-metals, and Metalloids Lab – Observing properties of metals, non-metals, and metalloids

Finding Metals, Non-metals, and Metalloids on the Periodic Table - Notes

Periodic Practice WS

Day 7:

Families on the Periodic Table Part I – Notes with lab activities for alkali metals and alkaline earth metals

Day 8:

Families on the Periodic Table Part II – Notes with lab activities for transition metals

Metals as Medicine/ Metals as Poison WS – Reading about element properties

Day 9:

Families on the Periodic Table Part III – Notes with activities for halogens and noble gases

Practice with Periodic Families WS

Day 10:

Periodic Trends Notes – Atomic radius, ionic radius, electronegativity, and ionization energy

The Elements of Dr. Rrrg – Practice with periodic trends

Day 11:

Research Part I

Day 12:

Research Part II

Conclusions

Copyright © E. Stubbe (The Wasp Whisperer)

All rights reserved by author.

Terms of Use: This document is for personal use only and may only be used by the original purchaser. This entire document, or any parts within, may not be reproduced or displayed for public viewing. You may NOT electronically post this product online including to teacher blogs, classroom websites or school networks. Failure to comply is a copyright infringement and a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Total Pages
94 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
3 Weeks
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
NGSSHS-ETS1-1
Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.
NGSSHS-PS1-2
Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties. Examples of chemical reactions could include the reaction of sodium and chlorine, of carbon and oxygen, or of carbon and hydrogen. Assessment is limited to chemical reactions involving main group elements and combustion reactions.
NGSSHS-PS2-6
Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials. Emphasis is on the attractive and repulsive forces that determine the functioning of the material. Examples could include why electrically conductive materials are often made of metal, flexible but durable materials are made up of long chained molecules, and pharmaceuticals are designed to interact with specific receptors. Assessment is limited to provided molecular structures of specific designed materials.
NGSSHS-ETS1-3
Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.
NGSSHS-PS1-1
Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms. Examples of properties that could be predicted from patterns could include reactivity of metals, types of bonds formed, numbers of bonds formed, and reactions with oxygen. Assessment is limited to main group elements. Assessment does not include quantitative understanding of ionization energy beyond relative trends.

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