Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby

Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
Crime Scene Introduction Lesson for The Great Gatsby
File Type

Google Slides™

(55 (some duplicates))
Product Rating
Standards
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  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

This is the absolute BEST introduction to The Great Gatsby. Students are engaged from the get-go as they struggle with unknown textual evidence and a crime scene with nine different clues to uncover what leads up to the tragic events in the novel. Students will do a close reading of select pieces of the text to form a detailed hypothesis of relationships, deeds, and guilt in the deaths that take place in the novel. This product includes the slideshow to introduce the lesson with textual evidence, and clues.

I have been teaching this novel for 13 years and this is the absolute best activity to start the novel. I have tested it for years and perfected all the nuances to make this come together to be one of the most memorable activities students will engage in in high school.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Total Pages
55 (some duplicates)
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
50 minutes
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