Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties

Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
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This is a pack of cursive practice featuring updated versions of George Washington's Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior In Company and Conversation:A Book of Etiquette. They would make great extra credit worksheets also.

The updated "rules" include:

Every action done in public should be with some sign of respect, to those that are present.
Keep your nails clean and short, also your hands and teeth clean, yet without being vain.
Do not talk with your mouth full.

If you cough, sneeze, sigh, or yawn, do it not loud but privately; and speak not in your yawning, but put your handkerchief or hand before your face and turn aside.

Tis ill manners to stay past your welcome. Always take your leave when asked, but not with great haste.

Sleep not when others speak, sit not when others stand, speak not when you should be silent, walk not on when others stop.
Turn not your back to others, especially in speaking; do not bump or tap other people when they are working; lean not upon anyone. Read no letters, books, or emails in company, but when there is a necessity for doing it you must ask them to go.
Come not near the books or writings of another so as to read them unless asked.
Do not laugh at the misfortune of others, even if they are not your friends.
If any one come to speak to you while you are sitting stand up.

Let your communication with men of business be short and comprehensive.

Treat everyone with respect and courtesy and not arrogance.

Do not make promises you cannot keep.

Do not argue what you do not know, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.

Do not teach your equal in things he is already skilled; it reeks of arrogance.

Do not express joy before one sick or in pain for that contrary passion will aggravate his misery.

When a man tries his best even though he does not succeed, do not tell him he never should have tried.
Do not joke in a hurtful manner, and if you say something witty and pleasant do not laugh at your own joke.
Be friendly and courteous; the first to say hello should hear and answer.
Do not wear clothes that smell bad, are ripped or stained but see they be changed once every day at least.
It is praiseworthy to have your conversation be without malice or envy.

In all causes of passion allow reason to prevail.

Before you speak. When another speaks be attentive.

Whisper not in the company of others. Do not relate news if you know not the truth thereof.

Be not curious to know the affairs of others neither approach those that speak in private.
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10
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Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties
Cursive Practice-George Washington's Book of Civilties