Distance Learning | Food Origins and Food Miles Activities and Games

Grade Levels
3rd - 4th
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
  • Activity
Pages
21 pages
$3.99
$3.99
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Easel Activity Included
This resource includes a ready-to-use interactive activity students can complete on any device. Easel by TpT is free to use! Learn more.

Description

Where does our food come from? It traveled to the grocery store somehow.

This collection was designed to empower students to make their own decisions regarding their nutrition, diet, and their impact on the environment.

- Students will do a brief study of the parts of plants that we eat to help them understand the origin of their meal.

- Children will use a map and the food in their lunchboxes to figure out the ‘food miles’ their food traveled to get to them.

- Students will learn to make a simple, healthy meal

A comprehensive list of materials needed and detailed directions are included in this packet. Each experience can be split into its own lesson.

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Related Resources:

How plants spread their seeds

Plant exploration

Plant Diagrams

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Total Pages
21 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
3 hours
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Understand a fraction 1/𝘣 as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into 𝘣 equal parts; understand a fraction 𝘢/𝑏 as the quantity formed by 𝘢 parts of size 1/𝘣.
Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

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