Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match

Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the RECIPROCAL Card Match
File Type

Zip

(1 MB|6 pages)
Product Rating
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Dividing Fractions Multiplying by the Reciprocal Card Match Game Activity for Math Station, Partners, or Small Groups. Students will practice matching the division problem with the RECIPROCAL multiplying problem. Pastel, colorful task cards. ZipFile contains the original Powerpoint version along with the PDF printable version. This will be a resource that you'll use year after year when teaching Division of Fractions and Reciprocals.

Be sure to L@@K at my other, 675+ TERRIFIC teaching resources!

~ ~ THANK YOU KINDLY ~ ~

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers.
Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. If 𝘱 and 𝘲 are integers, then –(𝘱/𝘲) = (β€“π˜±)/𝘲 = 𝘱/(β€“π˜²). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.
Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division and of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.
Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve word problems involving division of fractions by fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, create a story context for (2/3) Γ· (3/4) and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient; use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that (2/3) Γ· (3/4) = 8/9 because 3/4 of 8/9 is 2/3. (In general, (𝘒/𝘣) Γ· (𝘀/π˜₯) = 𝘒π˜₯/𝘣𝘀.) How much chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of chocolate equally? How many 3/4-cup servings are in 2/3 of a cup of yogurt? How wide is a rectangular strip of land with length 3/4 mi and area 1/2 square mi?
Explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction greater than 1 results in a product greater than the given number (recognizing multiplication by whole numbers greater than 1 as a familiar case); explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction less than 1 results in a product smaller than the given number; and relating the principle of fraction equivalence 𝘒/𝘣 = (π˜―Γ—π˜’)/(π˜―Γ—π˜£) to the effect of multiplying 𝘒/𝘣 by 1.
Total Pages
6 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
Report this Resource to TpT
Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Report this resource to let us know if this resource violates TpT’s content guidelines.
Loading...
$2.25
Digital Download
Share this resource
Report this resource to TpT
More products fromΒ Tricks and Treats for Teaching
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up