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Earth's Interior (Core, Mantle & Crust) Webquest - Great for Distance Learning!

Format
PDF (491 KB|8 pages)
Standards
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 Digital Resource for Students
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Description

This webquest is a self-guided mini-lesson that covers the basics about the crust, mantle and core.

GOOGLE DOC VERSION TOO - STUDENTS TYPE INTO DOCUMENT SO NO PRINTING NEEDED

Webquest includes the following:

• Labeling a diagram of the Earth layers

• Learning about lithospheric (tectonic) plates and the asthenosphere

• Interpreting graphs and maps on crust depth, earthquakes and tectonic plates

• Answering questions about a brief video

The webquest ends with review questions and includes a complete answer key for you.

Links to more Earth Science Products from Generation Science:

The Rock Cycle

Plate Tectonics

Active Volcanoes! In the Ring of Fire

Volcanoes! Of the United States

Total Pages
8 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
NGSSMS-ESS2-1
Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process. Emphasis is on the processes of melting, crystallization, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation, which act together to form minerals and rocks through the cycling of Earth’s materials. Assessment does not include the identification and naming of minerals.
NGSSMS-ESS2-2
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscience processes have changed Earth’s surface at varying time and spatial scales. Emphasis is on how processes change Earth’s surface at time and spatial scales that can be large (such as slow plate motions or the uplift of large mountain ranges) or small (such as rapid landslides or microscopic geochemical reactions), and how many geoscience processes (such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and meteor impacts) usually behave gradually but are punctuated by catastrophic events. Examples of geoscience processes include surface weathering and deposition by the movements of water, ice, and wind. Emphasis is on geoscience processes that shape local geographic features, where appropriate.
NGSSHS-ESS2-1
Develop a model to illustrate how Earth’s internal and surface processes operate at different spatial and temporal scales to form continental and ocean-floor features. Emphasis is on how the appearance of land features (such as mountains, valleys, and plateaus) and sea-floor features (such as trenches, ridges, and seamounts) are a result of both constructive forces (such as volcanism, tectonic uplift, and orogeny) and destructive mechanisms (such as weathering, mass wasting, and coastal erosion). Assessment does not include memorization of the details of the formation of specific geographic features of Earth’s surface.
NGSSHS-ESS2-3
Develop a model based on evidence of Earth’s interior to describe the cycling of matter by thermal convection. Emphasis is on both a one-dimensional model of Earth, with radial layers determined by density, and a three-dimensional model, which is controlled by mantle convection and the resulting plate tectonics. Examples of evidence include maps of Earth’s three-dimensional structure obtained from seismic waves, records of the rate of change of Earth’s magnetic field (as constraints on convection in the outer core), and identification of the composition of Earth’s layers from high-pressure laboratory experiments.
NGSSMS-ESS2-3
Analyze and interpret data on the distribution of fossils and rocks, continental shapes, and seafloor structures to provide evidence of the past plate motions. Examples of data include similarities of rock and fossil types on different continents, the shapes of the continents (including continental shelves), and the locations of ocean structures (such as ridges, fracture zones, and trenches). Paleomagnetic anomalies in oceanic and continental crust are not assessed.

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