Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle

Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Easter Themed 12 Scoot Bundle
Format
PDF (60 MB|86 pages)
Standards
$5.00
Digital Download
$5.00
Digital Download
  • Product Description
  • Standards

This bundle of scoot cards includes 12 sets of cards and over 80 pages. Each set has 20 cards, a recording sheet, and an answer key with cute Easter-themed graphics. With these sets students can practice: making tens to add, making tens to subtract, place value, adding/subtracting 10 and 100, numbers in word form, numbers to and from expanded form, balancing equations, doubles, doubles +1, and doubles +2.

Print these cards on cardstock and laminate them for durability. Punch a hole in the corner and add a metal ring to have students solve them at their seats or hang them up throughout the room and let students move around and stretch.

Cards feature Dyslexic-friendly font to help with readability.

These sets are also available individually in my store but save money here by buying the entire set.

Individual Sets

Making a Ten to Add

Making a Ten to Subtract

Place Value

Adding/Subtracting 10

Adding/Subtracting 100

Word Form

To Expanded Form

From Expanded Form

Balancing Equations

Doubles

Doubles +1

Doubles +2

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ▯ - 3, 6 + 6 = ▯.
Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.
Total Pages
86 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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