Elements of Poetry Unit | Genre Study for Third, Fourth, and Fifth Grades

Brenda Kovich
3.2k Followers
Grade Levels
3rd - 5th, Homeschool
Standards
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Pages
70 pages
$8.00
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$8.00
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Brenda Kovich
3.2k Followers
Includes Google Apps™
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    Description

    In this genre study, students learn about structures of poetry, annotate poems to label elements and sound devices, locate figurative language, memorize, compare and contrast, and explore meter. They mark up the text to indicate rhyme, rhythm, verses, stanzas, onomatopoeia, personification, and alliteration.

    To support distance or blended learning, the unit can be shared through Google Classroom. Your third, fourth, and fifth graders can access the resources in printable or digital form.

    To get a better look at the poetry resources, open the previews.

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    Total Pages
    70 pages
    Answer Key
    Included
    Teaching Duration
    2 Weeks
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    Standards

    to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
    Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
    Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.
    Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

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