Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host far fewer germs

Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

This lesson includes 4 activities:
1- Reading a current science article; 2- answering guide questions about the article; 3- answering a matching activity; and 4-completing a double puzzle.

Class: Date: Name:
READING GUIDE – Cell recount: People host far fewer germs
https://student.societyforscience.org/article/cell-recount-people-host-far-fewer-germs?mode=topic&context=79

1. Why are lactobacillus bacteria considered human-friendly?
2. How does the old and new estimates of germs in the human body compare to the new estimate?
Answer questions 3-5 by referring to the illustration, “Human cells, by percent”
3. What cell types are the most common in humans?
4. What percentage of human cells are fat cells?
5. What groups of cells comprise approximately equal percentage of human cells?
6. What type of cells comprise 90 out of every 100 human body cells?
7. Evaluate the claim (prove it right or wrong) that “most human cells in the body do not contain DNA”?
8. How is it possible that muscle and fat cells make up 75% of human cells by weight but 84% of cells are red blood cells?
9. Where do most of the bacteria in the body live? How many bacteria live there?
10. Explain why women’s bacteria-to-human cell ratio may be about 30 percent higher than that of men.
Class: Date: Name:

MATCHING - Cell recount: People host far fewer germs

Instruction: Write the letter of the correct match in the box after each number.

1. Nucleus A. The study of microorganisms, principally bacteria, fungi and viruses.
2. Microbiology B. The smallest of blood cells, their role is to search for signs that a vessel has been damaged and congregate at the site to plug any hole.
3. Germ C. A domain of life that includes single-celled organisms. Although archaea superficially resemble bacteria, they are distinct.
4. Back of the envelope D. The majority of the large intestine, it runs between the cecum and the rectum.
5. Archaeon E. The microorganisms that live in a particular place or geological period. Scientists call the entirety of the microorganisms in a human or other animal its microbiome.
6. Ratio F. A dense structure present in many cells. Typically a single rounded structure encased within a membrane.
7. Fungus G. Scientists who study microbes and the infections they can cause or ways that they can interact with their environment
8. Microbiologists H. One of a group of single- or multiple-celled organisms that reproduce via spores and feed on living or decaying organic matter.
9. Platelets I. Any one-celled microorganism. Some of them cause disease. Others can promote the health of higher-order organisms.
10. Red blood cells J. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of molecules essential to life.
11. Colon K. The relationship between two numbers or amounts. When written out, the numbers usually are separated by a colon, such as a 50:50.
12. Microbiota L. A pouch below the small intestine
13. Microbe M. Colored red by hemoglobin, these cells move oxygen from the lungs to all tissues of the body.
14. Molecular biology N. A living thing that is too small to see with the unaided eye.
15. Cecum O. A structure in all cells found outside of their nuclei. Here the cell breaks down nutrients and converts them into a form of energy known as ATP.
16. Mitochondria P. A common phrase used to describe a calculation that is done quickly, often without much research, just to give a preliminary estimate.
17. Virus Q. Tiny infectious particles consisting of RNA or DNA surrounded by protein. They can reproduce only by injecting their genetic material into the cells of living creatures.
Class: Date: Name:

DOUBLE PUZZLE
Unscramble each of the clue words. Copy the letters in the numbered cells to other cells with the same number.


The FINAL PHRASE below is made up of letters from the clue words you input above. The letters are numbered, making the puzzle a little easier to solve.

Teacher’s guide
1. Reproduce the article, “Cell recount: People host far fewer germs” found at https://student.societyforscience.org/article/cell-recount-people-host-far-fewer-germs?mode=topic&context=79
(The Society for Science & the Public, publisher of Science News and Science News for Students, grants non-exclusive, one-time rights to reproduce content to third parties for editorial, commercial and educational purposes.)

2. Reading. Have students read the article. Highlight or underline main ideas and important facts.

3. Reading Guide Questions. Have students answer the

4. MATCHING. Have students write the UPPERCASE letter of the correct match in the box after each number.

5. DOUBLE PUZZLE. Have students unscramble each of the clue words. Instruct them to copy the letters in the numbered cells to other cells with the same number.
a. The FINAL PHRASE is made up of letters from the clue words that students input in the word scramble. The letters are numbered, making the puzzle a little easier to solve.


Answer Key


1. READING GUIDE

1. Why are lactobacillus bacteria considered human-friendly? Lactobacillus bacteria, can live in the human gut. Some hunt down and poison disease-causing germs. That can make them quite human-friendly.
2. How does the old and new estimates of germs in the human body compare to the new estimate? Old estimates assessed about 10 bacteria for every truly human cell. Now scientists estimate that there are only about 30 percent more germs than human cells.
Answer questions 3-5 by referring to the illustration, “Human cells, by percent”
3. What cell types are the most common in humans? Erythrocytes (Red Blood Cells) 84%
4. What percentage of human cells are fat cells? 0.2%
5. What groups of cells comprise approximately equal percentage of human cells? Epidermal cells = 0.5%; Bronchial endothelial cells = 0.5%; Respiratory interstitial cells = 0.5%
6. What type of cells comprise 90 out of every 100 human body cells? Blood cells of some type
7. Evaluate the claim (prove it right or wrong) that “most human cells in the body do not contain DNA”? As red blood cells mature they get rid of their nuclei. These nuclei were where cells stored most of their DNA. Since 84% of human cells are red blood cells, the claim is proven right.
8. How is it possible that muscle and fat cells make up 75% of human cells by weight but 84% of cells are red blood cells? Each muscle or fat cell is so big and heavy. In terms of numbers, muscle and fat represent only about 0.2 percent of the total. While 84% of a human’s cells are red blood cells, they are so small and their weight is so much lesser than muscle or fat cells.
9. Where do most of the bacteria in the body live? How many bacteria live there? In the colon. An estimated 39 trillion of the 40 trillion bacteria live in the colon.
10. Explain why women’s bacteria-to-human cell ratio may be about 30 percent higher than that of men. Women tend to have a smaller volume of blood than do men. That means their bacteria-to-human cell ratio may be about 30 percent higher than that of men.





2. MATCHING

1. F Nucleus A. The study of microorganisms, principally bacteria, fungi and viruses.
2. A Microbiology B. The smallest of blood cells, their role is to search for signs that a vessel has been damaged and congregate at the site to plug any hole.
3. I Germ C. A domain of life that includes single-celled organisms. Although archaea superficially resemble bacteria, they are distinct.
4. P Back of the envelope D. The majority of the large intestine, it runs between the cecum and the rectum.
5. C Archaeon E. The microorganisms that live in a particular place or geological period. Scientists call the entirety of the microorganisms in a human or other animal its microbiome.
6. K Ratio F. A dense structure present in many cells. Typically a single rounded structure encased within a membrane.
7. H Fungus G. Scientists who study microbes and the infections they can cause or ways that they can interact with their environment
8. G Microbiologists H. One of a group of single- or multiple-celled organisms that reproduce via spores and feed on living or decaying organic matter.
9. B Platelets I. Any one-celled microorganism. Some of them cause disease. Others can promote the health of higher-order organisms.
10. M Red blood cells J. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of molecules essential to life.
11. D Colon K. The relationship between two numbers or amounts. When written out, the numbers usually are separated by a colon, such as a 50:50.
12. E Microbiota L. A pouch below the small intestine
13. N Microbe M. Colored red by hemoglobin, these cells move oxygen from the lungs to all tissues of the body.
14. J Molecular biology N. A living thing that is too small to see with the unaided eye.
15. L Cecum O. A structure in all cells found outside of their nuclei. Here the cell breaks down nutrients and converts them into a form of energy known as ATP.
16. O Mitochondria P. A common phrase used to describe a calculation that is done quickly, often without much research, just to give a preliminary estimate.
17. Q Virus Q. Tiny infectious particles consisting of RNA or DNA surrounded by protein. They can reproduce only by injecting their genetic material into the cells of living creatures.

3. DOUBLE PUZZLE:
Nucleus
Microbiology
Germ
Archaeon
Ratio
Fungus
Microbiologists
Platelets Red_blood_cells
Colon
Microbiota
Microbe
Molecular_Biology
Cecum
Mitochondria
Virus
Final Phrase: Humans host thirty percent more germs than human cells
Total Pages
6
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
50 Minutes

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Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
Emergency Lesson or Sub Plan - Cell recount: People host f
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